President Trump has said: “Chain migration is a disaster for this country and it’s horrible.”

He is right. According to Department of Homeland Security statistics, since 2007, the U.S. has admitted over 117,000 individuals from the three countries that the State Department recognizes as state-sponsors of terrorism: Iran, Syria, and Sudan.

How is the U.S. economy or way of life enriched by a massive influx of Iranians, Sudanese, and Syrians? What are they bringing to the table? Of course, even to ask such a question is islamofauxbic.

But the grim reality is that to bring in such people in large numbers without adequate vetting procedures (and what vetting procedures can be adequate for a religion of taqiyya and deceit?) is like playing Russian roulette.

The longer we do it, the less likely it is to end well.

Look what happened with the fifteen jihadis on this list. And until this program is stopped, they will by no means be the last ones.

“WH Shows 15 Jihadis Who Got Visas by Lottery or Chain Migration,” by Neil Munro, Breitbart, February 2, 2018 (thanks to Tom):

White House officials rolled out a list of 15 visa-lottery jihadis and chain-migration terrorists to pressure Democrats towards a compromise on the president’s “framework” amnesty-and-immigration plan.

The February 2 list of jihadis includes a senior leader in the Islamic counter-attack against personal freedom, Mousa Mohammed Abu Marzook. He is an “alleged United States Hamas leader [who] received his green card through a predecessor program to the visa lottery,” said the statement. “Marzook was deported in 1997 for terrorist activities.”

The statement backs up Trump’s speech in the State of the Union speech, where he urged elimination of the visa lottery and chain migration programs, saying:

It is time to begin moving towards a merit-based immigration system, one that admits people who are skilled, who want to work who will contribute to our society and who will love and respect our country.

The jihadis include seven “mujahids” who arrived via the visa lottery and six “jihadis” who arrived via chain migration. They include:

  • Sayfullo Saipov, a national of Uzbekistan, entered the United States in 2010 through the visa lottery program. On October 31, 2017, Saipov was arrested after he allegedly used a truck to run down numerous pedestrians on a bike lane on the west side of Manhattan, killing eight individuals.
  • Hesham Mohamed Ali Hedayet, a national of Egypt, was able to claim Lawful Permanent Resident status through a family member who received their status via visa lottery in 1997. In July 2002, Hedayet opened fire at the El Al Airlines ticket counter at LAX airport, murdering two ticket agents and wounding three others.
  • Ahmed Amin El-Mofty, an Egyptian national, entered the United States through a distant relative (chain migration) and became a United States citizen after arriving. Last month, El-Mofty was killed during a shootout after allegedly opening fire and targeting police at multiple locations in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania.
  • Akayed Ullah, a Bangladeshi national, entered the United States in 2011 through chain migration. Ullah was allowed to enter the country as the family member of a visa lottery winner. On December 12, 2017, Ullah allegedly attempted to detonate a homemade pipe bomb in the New York City Port Authority Bus Terminal. The failed explosion injured himself and four bystanders.

The believers in Islam’s jihad doctrine arrived as far back as 1980, although only one — Marzook — acted against American “kaffirs” before 2001.

Trump’s four-part amnesty-and-immigration plan would provide an amnesty for at least 1.8 million ‘dreamer’ illegals. But it would not reduce chain migration for more than ten years because Democrats and business-first GOP leaders — such as Texas Sen. John Cornyn — persuaded Trump to accept all of the four million worker/consumers who are in the line.

Many of the 15 jihadis announced February 2 were cleared to become citizens under Presidents George W. Bush and Barack Obama, even though the citizen-application document — the N-400 — asks people:

Have you even been a member of, or in any way, associated (either directly or indirectly) with A. The Communist Party B. Any other totalitarian organization C. A terrorist organization

Have you ever advocated (either directly or indirectly) the overthrow of any government by force or violence?

Have you ever persecuted (either directly or indirectly) any person because of race, religion, national, origin, membership in a particular social group, or political opinion?

The 15 people on the new list are only a small share of the jihadis convicted in the United States. For example, by July 2016, 101 people named “Muhammad” or a derivative have been convicted of jihad-related crimes.

Under Trump’s first executive order directed against jihadis, he sought to exclude people with “hateful attitude” from citizenship. That section was removed under amid a huge wave of hatred from pro-diversity advocates and progressive judges.Here is the critical passage from Trump’s January pro-American immigration policy:

In order to protect Americans, the United States must ensure that those admitted to this country do not bear hostile attitudes toward it and its founding principles. The United States cannot, and should not, admit those who do not support the Constitution, or those who would place violent ideologies over American law. In addition, the United States should not admit those who engage in acts of bigotry or hatred (including “honor” killings, other forms of violence against women, or the persecution of those who practice religions different from their own) or those who would oppress Americans of any race, gender, or sexual orientation.

Polls show the public strongly supports Trump’s push to exclude “hostile attitudes.”…

Article posted with permission from Pamela Geller

Pamela Geller's commitment to freedom from jihad and Shariah shines forth in her books

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