The free-thinking argument, that blows away the notion of illegal prostitution, is that of pornography. Pornography, or porn, is nothing more than prostitution that has been state-sanctioned, taxed, filmed, and distributed. However, because it is taxed — politicians have generally left it alone — until now. A ridiculous new way for the state to generate revenue has appeared as an act of legislation in Arizona this week as lawmakers try to force citizens to pay the state before they view porn online. But it gets much worse.

The newly proposed legislation, House Bill 2444 is proposed by State Rep. Gail Griffin and will implement software that is designed to block any material on the internet deemed “obscene” by the state.

The bill would force the installation of this software on all devices in the state which access the internet. According to the legislation, no product that accesses the internet can be sold, leased, distributed or made in the state unless it contains software that blocks obscene materials by default.

take our poll - story continues below

Should President Trump declare a national emergency to build the wall?

  • Should President Trump declare a national emergency to build the wall?  

  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.
Completing this poll grants you access to Freedom Outpost updates free of charge. You may opt out at anytime. You also agree to this site's Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.

Yes, we know how Orwellian this sounds.

According to FOX 4, under the bill, people who wish to deactivate the blocking software must make a request to the person or company that distributed the device, present ID to prove he or she is at least 18, and, among other things, pay a deactivation fee of at least $20 to the Arizona Commerce Authority. The fees will then go to a fund that will finance a number of initiatives via grants, including the building of a border wall between Mexico and Arizona, or fund border security.

The bill goes on in detail to explain what type of content it deems obscene. Its description would be laughable outside the ominous implications for such software. Some of the “obscene” content are things like the top of a woman’s breast—because to statists, the woman’s body is “obscene.”

(a)  LESS THAN COMPLETELY AND OPAQUELY COVERED HUMAN GENITALS, PUBIC REGION, BUTTOCK OR FEMALE BREAST BELOW A POINT IMMEDIATELY ABOVE THE TOP OF THE AREOLA.

(b)  HUMAN MALE GENITALS IN A DISCERNIBLY TURGID STATE, WHETHER COVERED OR UNCOVERED.

Naturally, the bill’s supporters are touting this bill as a means to protect victims of human trafficking. However, as we’ve seen with the deletion of backpage and craigslist personals, this has only fostered a more dangerous environment for sex workers who are now forced back out on the streets.

Anyone who removes or attempts to subvert the software, according to the bill, will be committing a crime and will be prosecuted as such.

A PERSON MAY NOT SHARE THE METHOD, SOURCE CODE OR OTHER OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS FOR DEACTIVATING A FILTER.  A PERSON WHO VIOLATES THIS SUBSECTION IS GUILTY OF A CLASS 1 MISDEMEANOR.

While this bill may seem out of left field, it is not an original idea. As TFTP reported in 2016, lawmakers in South Carolina attempted a similar scheme.

In South Carolina, according to the since-failed legislation, computer sellers would be required to install digital blocking capabilities on computers and other devices with access to the internet to block people from viewing pornography and other ‘obscene content.’

Also, as TFTP reported, in March of the same year, the Utah House of Representatives passed a resolution declaring the depiction of erotic behavior (as in pictures or writing) intended to cause sexual excitement, also known as pornography, as a public health crisis. Supporters of the resolution likened pornography to an infectious disease.

“We do need to see this (pornography) like avian flu, cholera, diphtheria or polio,” said Elder Jeffrey R. Holland, member of the LDS Church’s Quorum of the Twelve Apostles. “It needs to be eradicated.”

This resolution was the first of its kind in the United States, but it’s a notion that is becoming increasingly popular among religious lawmakers as now evidenced in South Carolina and Arizona.

While this is all done with the ostensible good intentions of well meaning God-fearing folk as a means to raise money, the very notion of government mandated functionality on electronic devices that can block ANY content, up to and including porn, should set off alarms.

First, they came for the pornography.

If for one second, you think that the state would limit its ability to block internet access solely reserved for pornography, you haven’t been paying attention. The federal government, right this moment, is plotting away behind marble walls to conceive ways to stop you from viewing content they deem inappropriate — fake news anyone?

It is a win-win for tyranny. Under the guise of blocking ‘obscene content’, the state gets to force device manufacturers to install built-in functionality designed for government-sanctioned censorship — all the while keeping tabs on the hardware, but collecting money to free up porn access.

While the notion of pornography isn’t the best way to sell the opposition against this bill, the idea of government hardware or software installed on electronic devices with the sole function of censoring content deemed ‘obscene’ by the state should shock the conscience.

Please share this story so that people can stand up to one of the most tyrannical examples of a legislative wolf in sheep’s clothing that we’ve ever seen.

If you would like to contact Gail Griffin and peacefully voice just how horrific a bill like this would be, you can do so below:

EMAIL [email protected]

Capitol Office

House of Representatives
1700 West Washington
Room Room 225
Phoenix, AZ 85007

PHONE 602-926-5895

Article posted with permission from The Free Thought Project

Don't forget to Like Freedom Outpost on Facebook, Google Plus, & Twitter. You can also get Freedom Outpost delivered to your Amazon Kindle device here.