Here is the madness of Britain’s immigration policies on abundant display.

“In his first interview with immigration officials on January 18, 2016, Hassan said he had been trained to kill by jihadis with 1,000 other people, adding: ‘They trained us on how to kill. It was all religious-based.'”

And they let him in.

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But they have banned me and other foes of jihad terror from the country.

Their priorities are clear.

The British authorities brought this bombing on the country and should be held responsible for it.

“Iraqi teenager ‘used his £20 school prize to buy the ingredients for Parsons Green Tube bomb’ – 18 months AFTER telling border staff ISIS trained him how to kill,” by Rebecca Camber, Daily Mail, March 8, 2018 (thanks to Lukasz):

A teenage asylum seeker set off a bomb on the Tube after coming to Britain in the back of a lorry and telling the Home Office he was trained to kill by Islamic State, a court heard yesterday.

Iraqi Ahmed Hassan, 18, is accused of building a deadly explosive device, packed with 5lbs of knives, screwdrivers and nails for ‘maximum carnage’, at the foster home where he was given refuge.

The bomb contained 14oz of the explosive TATP, commonly known as ‘Mother of Satan’, and sent a fireball through a District Line carriage packed with rush-hour commuters – injuring 30 – at Parsons Green station in West London on September 15 last year.

The Old Bailey heard that it was a ‘matter of luck’ the bomb did not fully detonate and no-one was killed. Jurors were also told that:

Hassan sneaked into Britain through the Channel Tunnel aged 15
He openly declared his links to IS when he applied to the Home Office for asylum

The teenager was allegedly seen by staff at a charity-run shelter looking at an IS video and listening to jihadi songs, yet no-one raised the alarm;

While his foster parents were on holiday, Hassan ordered bomb ingredients on Amazon using a £20 gift voucher he won after being named ‘student of the year’;

He loaded his bucket bomb with shrapnel, including screwdrivers and drill bits bought from Asda and Aldi.

The alleged bomber openly declared his links to IS when he applied for asylum after arriving in Britain as a lone child refugee, the court was told.

In his first interview with immigration officials on January 18, 2016, Hassan said he had been trained to kill by jihadis with 1,000 other people, adding: ‘They trained us on how to kill. It was all religious-based.’

But he claimed he went along with it only because he feared the fanatics could kill his family, and said he was claiming asylum in Britain because he was ‘in fear of Islamic State’, the court heard.

Prosecutor Alison Morgan described what Hassan – who had no identity documents to verify his name or age – said to immigration officials.

She said: ‘He was forced to go on his own otherwise they would kill his family and he shared training with 1,000 people and they would spend three to four hours a day in the mosque.’

The 15-year-old denied being a sleeper IS fighter sent to Europe and claimed he fled to Britain after being freed by Iraqi soldiers.

But shortly after his arrival in the UK, Hassan was seen by staff at a shelter in Horley, Surrey, run by children’s charity Barnados secretly watching a video featuring masked men with machine guns bearing an IS flag, it was said.

He was also allegedly caught listening to a ‘call to arms’ song, with the lyrics: ‘We are coming with you to the slaughter in your home and country.’…

Article posted with permission from Pamela Geller

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