Nope, it's not another "conspiracy theory."  It's a conspiracy fact that was carried out by the US Army.

Army records reveal that the US government conducted secret testing of zinc cadmium sulfide that included radioactive materials on vulnerable and poor populations by spraying, injecting and feeding hazardous chemicals to Americans during the Cold War.

Author and professor Dr. Lisa Martino-Taylor brought some of these revelations to light in her book, Behind the Fog: How the US Cold War Radiological Weapons Program Exposed Innocent Americans.

The book is said to be a comprehensive examination of the United States' Cold War radiological weapons program. The book examines controversial military-sponsored studies and open-air field trials using radioactive "simulants" that exposed American civilians to radiation and other hazardous substances without their knowledge or consent during the Cold War in violation of their civil and human rights. The book documents the coordinated efforts of a tight-knit group of military scientists who advanced a four-pronged secret program of human-subject radiation studies that targeted unsuspecting Americans for Cold War military purposes.

According to the Associated Press, "Martino-Taylor used Freedom of Information Act requests to obtain previously unreleased documents, including Army records. She also reviewed already public records and published articles."

"She told The Associated Press that she found that a small group of researchers, aided by leading academic institutions, worked to develop radiological weapons and later "combination weapons" using radioactive materials along with chemical or biological weapons."

"They targeted the most vulnerable in society in most cases," Martino-Taylor said. "They targeted children. They targeted pregnant women in Nashville. People who were ill in hospitals. They targeted wards of the state. And they targeted minority populations."

The AP also pointed out:

The tests in Nashville in the late 1940s involved giving 820 poor and pregnant white women a mixture during their first pre-natal visit that included radioactive iron, Martino-Taylor said. The women were chosen without their knowledge. Blood tests were performed to determine how much radioactive iron had been absorbed by the mother, and the babies' blood was tested at birth. Similar tests were performed in Chicago and San Francisco, Martino-Taylor said.

CBS News reported on the Cold War tests in Missouri:

In the mid-1950s, and again a decade later, the Army used motorized blowers atop a low-income housing high-rise, at schools and from the backs of station wagons to send a potentially dangerous compound into the already-hazy air in predominantly black areas of St. Louis.

Local officials were told at the time that the government was testing a smoke screen that could shield St. Louis from aerial observation in case the Russians attacked.

But in 1994, the government said the tests were part of a biological weapons program and St. Louis was chosen because it bore some resemblance to Russian cities that the U.S. might attack. The material being sprayed was zinc cadmium sulfide, a fine fluorescent powder.

The Army has admitted only to using blowers to spread the chemical, but Mary Helen Brindell recalled a summer day playing baseball with other kids in the street when a squadron of green Army planes flew close to the ground and dropped a powdery substance. She went inside, washed it off her face and arms, then went back out to play.

Brindell said she has suffered from “breast, thyroid, skin and uterine cancers,” and her sister died of a rare form of esophageal cancer.

“I just want an explanation from the government. Why would you do that to people?” she said.

Martino-Taylor's research has stirred up both US senators from Missouri, Claire McCaskill and Roy Blunt, to the point that they wrote to Army Secretary John McHugh demanding answers.

They aren't the only representatives who are taking issue with the spraying.

Three House Democrats, who represent areas where testing occurred, — William Lacy Clay of Missouri, Brad Sherman of California and Jim Cooper of Tennessee, said they were outraged by the revelations, as well.

KMOV-TV reported:

Katherine Hammack, assistant secretary of the Army, said in a letter received by Blunt’s office on Friday that Army investigators reviewed several assessments and studies compiled over the past nearly two decades and found no health risk from the zinc cadmium sulfide (ZnCdS) sprayed in St. Louis.

Following the letters from the senators, Army investigators looked at several studies conducted since information about the testing was declassified in 1994, including a study conducted by the Army and others conducted by the National Research Council Committee on Toxicology and the National Academy of Sciences’ Institute of Medicine.

“The U.S. Army Public Health Command reconfirms that exposure to ZnCdS, under the test conditions reported, would not cause a health risk in humans,” Hammack wrote. “Further, these reports contain no evidence of a radioactive component to the ZnCdS dispersion testing as has been alleged in the media.”

The real issue here is that the US Army was spraying this stuff on unsuspecting American citizens, something they had no business doing.  This is what Communist regimes do, not the people of America!

The government has absolutely no right and no authority to have engaged in this act.  In my opinion, no matter how much they claim it is safe, it appears to me to be criminal.

I suppose too many Americans are just willing to trust their government's word about all of this, sort of like they want to trust them when it comes to the JFK assassination despite all the incriminating evidence against them.

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