This should come as no surprise to anyone. The money was intended to help Afghan Muslim women join the workforce. But in Afghanistan, and in Islamic law, women are essentially only slaves of men. They have no business joining the workforce and working outside the home. They should just be cooking and cleaning and having babies. This comes from the Islamic reduction of women to the status of commodities, and that’s why this program failed, but of course, no one in USAID will ever examine or admit that. They are claiming the problem was that the program was poorly organized. Yeah, that’s it.

“A $280 Million U.S. Aid Program Was Supposed To Help 75,000 Afghan Women. It Helped 60.,” by Zuri Davis, Reason, September 13, 2018 (thanks to Christian):

Since 2015, The United States Agency for International Development (USAID) has spent $280 million on a program intended to help tens of thousands of Afghan women enter their country’s work force and gain promotions. According to a report from the Special Inspector General for Afghan Reconstruction (SIGAR), the program has helped somewhere between no women and roughly 60.

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USAID’s “Promote” program is the agency’s “largest women’s empowerment program in [USAID] history,” according to the program’s website. It was supposed to train Afghan women to enter the private and public sectors, and then help them become eligible for promotions in their fields. And it was intended to extend those training and hiring benefits to 75,000 Afghan women.

But SIGAR found that in the three years since Promote’s 2015 founding, the number of women who found “new or better” employment was closer to 55. SIGAR added that it could not conclusively credit the women’s successes to the program. SIGAR also reported that it is “unclear” whether or not the Afgan government will choose to support the program “as the Afghan government might not be able to hire all of Promote’s graduates.” It is also “unclear whether the graduates will obtain jobs in the private sector in large numbers due to the country’s low projected economic growth rate.”…

Article posted with permission from Pamela Geller

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