Ferguson, Missouri. They just can't let it alone. You know the story. A Ferguson policeman, Darren Wilson, who happened to be white, shot and killed a young African American, Michael Brown, while resisting arrest for having just robbed a convenience store. There were various versions of the story, but in the end, a 12 member bi-racial grand jury found that the officer was properly doing the job for which he was hired, and therefore innocent of any criminal wrongdoing.

Of course, politics always gets involved in these things, so US Attorney General Eric Holder brought in a squad of a hundred or so FBI agents to determine if in the process of attempting to arrest Mr. Brown, his civil rights had been violated. But after an extensive investigation, they too found that Officer Wilson was just doing his job.

Well, if Officer Wilson was just doing his job, then those who directed the duties and responsibilities of his job must be the guilty ones.

Attorney General Holder, having already tendered his resignation, needed something to bolster his legacy as a guardian of the poor and the downtrodden. So, back came the FBI agents, this time determined to find racial prejudice within the police force itself, and, if necessary, the entire Ferguson community!

To make their point, Holder's civil rights crew combed through several years of Ferguson Police Department data on traffic stops, searches, and arrests. In a 105-page report, they found "a pattern of racial disparities in Ferguson's police activities," as evidenced by the fact that blacks accounted for 85% of vehicle stops, while comprising only 67% of Ferguson's population, while whites made up 15% of stops, despite representing 29% of the population. With this evidence the Feds demanded a total overhaul of the department. Veteran police chief Tom Jackson and City Manager John Shaw both resigned rather than face threatened legal action by the Obama Justice Department. But the violence continues.

This racial percentage discrepancy argument has been presented more times that I would care to count. It might have validity if each of us was created identical, rather than equal. We are not.

But for reasons of political correctness, the point never raised is this: Is it just possible that those being arrested more often are those that are breaking the law more often?

Don't know. Just askin'. Seems like nobody else will.

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