'Sherko Omer,' the son of a successful businessman in Iraqi Kurdistan, initially went to Syria to join the Free Syrian Army's fight against Bashar al-Assad, but found himself sucked in to ISIS, unable to leave. He was given a job as a "communication technician," and worked at the ISIS communications bureau in Raqqa until he finally decided he had enough and escaped.

What he reveals is probably better than any intelligence—he was in, saw everything, and heard everything, and its eye opening.

Newsweek, who were able to interview him, concluded that ISIS sees Turkey as its ally with a huge extent to which the cooperation of the Turkish military and border forces allows the terrorist group, who now control large parts of Iraq and Syria.

"ISIS commanders told us to fear nothing at all because there was full cooperation with the Turks," said Omer of crossing the border into Turkey, "and they reassured us that nothing will happen, especially when that is how they regularly travel from Raqqa and Aleppo to the Kurdish areas further northeast of Syria because it was impossible to travel through Syria as YPG controlled most parts of the Kurdish region."

In fact, Shoebat.com is able to show one of several leaked videos of such cooperation released by Kurds who monitored the borders having had enough of such cooperation:


 

"…ISIS had to be a Turkish ally because only through Turkey were they able to deploy ISIS fighters to northern parts of the Kurdish cities and towns in Syria."

"I have connected ISIS field captains and commanders from Syria with people in Turkey on innumerable occasions," said Omer.

"I rarely heard them speak in Arabic, and that was only when they talked to their own recruiters, otherwise, they mostly spoke in Turkish because the people they talked to were Turkish officials of some sorts because ISIS guys used to be very serious when they talked to them."

Omer was then transferred to a battalion travelling to fight Kurdish forces in Serekaniya, north-eastern Syria, and describes travelling through Turkey in a convoy of trucks, staying at safehouses along the way, before crossing back into Syria at the Ceylanpinar border crossing.

Before crossing the border back into Syria, he says: "My ISIS commander reassured us once again that it was all going to be all right because cooperation had been made with the Turks. He frequently talked on the radio in Turkish."

"While we tried to cross the Ceylanpinar border post, the Turkish soldiers' watchtower light spotted us. The commander quickly told us to stay calm, stay in position and not to look at the light. He talked on the radio in Turkish again, and we stayed in our positions. Watchtower light then moved about 10 minutes later and the commander ordered us to move because the watchtower light moving away from us was the signal that we could safely cross the border into Serekaniye."

Once in Serekaniye, Omer surrendered to Kurdish forces when they attacked his camp. He was held for several months before his captors were convinced that he had not been a fighter in ISIS and had not taken part in violence.

Turkey's intentions of establishing a Caliphate and extending its power through military means has become obvious. While all eyes are focused on Russia, Turkey has dispatched a warship to Cyprus to protect an oil and gas research ship intended to pull resources by theft and the situation is threatening to provoke a diplomatic crisis.

Greek Cypriots have suspended island unification talks and called for Ankara's EU bid to be also suspended. And on Friday, Greece has warned NATO partner Turkey not to intimidate Cyprus over Turkish efforts to develop off-shore natural gas fields. The Greek intervention is the latest ratcheting up of regional tensions over the disputed energy fields.

Carnegie Institute visiting scholar Sinan Ulgen said the decision to suspend talks could be far reaching.

"They had reached a critical stage," Ulgen said. "All the more so since it was the first time since the failure of the Annan (reunification) plan back in 2004, that the negotiations had reached such an advanced stage. And given that, this may have been a last effort to reach settlement on Cyprus."

Last month, Brussels issued a stern warning to Turkey over Cyprus. But analyst Ulgen said such warnings do not carry the weight they once did.

"Ankara feels confident, it will not be alienated by the international community on Cyprus."

Turkey, which does not recognize the international Law of the Sea, has its eyes on the potentially lucrative energy findings in the Aegean Sea and said that the island's natural resources also belong to Turkish Cypriots who have occupied the northern third of the island since an unlawful Turkish invasion in 1974.

The issue of Cyprus is not just an issue of gas and resources. It is an issue of the destiny of the Christians in the region. For more on this read Holy Christendom Will Rise Again, And World War Three Will Happen Between Christendom And The Islamic Empire Of The Antichrist.

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