In what appears to be a subtle but disturbing trend, children are being targeted by Islamic supremacists in a most diabolical way. Islamic messages and prayers are implanted in beloved toys. This year for Christmas, no less — Christmas – toy F-16's were fitted out with Islamic prayers instead of jet noises.

The Seattle Times reported Tuesday that "when a Bellingham child opened a Christmas gift, something was 'very, very wrong' with the sound the F-16 made, KING-TV reported." Instead of jet noises, it loudly played an Islamic prayer. "The toy's manufacturer, WolVol, blamed its factory for the mistake," said the Times. The plane played prayers that Muslims chant while they are on the pilgrimage to Mecca.

So who replaced the jet noises in this toy plane with this prayer? If WolVol is telling the truth that this was the factory's fault, where is their factory? Saudi Arabia? Who is working at that factory, and what is going on there, for something like this to happen?

Could this whole incident be any creepier? Imagine if Christian prayers had been discovered to have been surreptitiously inserted in Muslim toys for Ramadan. There would be a full-blown international investigation into this "Islamophobic" incident, with Interpol, MI5, the CIA, and the FBI working in double shifts to find the "right-wing Christian extremist cell" working in the toy factory.

The Bellingham, Washington child's toy was not a one-off. Amazon's product page for this toy plane is full of comments from people who also got the Islamic chant: "Not as advertised. Does not play jet noises. Plays an Arabic chant that is extremely bizarre for a child's toy." That's an understatement. Another buyer wrote: "Very loud Middle Eastern chanting and music! It's weird and scary! This is a very un-American product! I was expecting jet noises, NOT this! The toy is dirty as well. I'm sending it back if I can find the box!"

Some laid on the sarcasm thick: "I have been wanting to convert my 3 year old son to Islam for a long time and haven't been able to motivate him to do so. This toy is great it lights up, has a prayer from the Qur'an in Arabic and fun for the whole family! The quality is good for a toy made in plastic and color is great. Thanks for reading and allahu akbar!" The best comment was this one: "It plays a recording of Islamic verses. I am surprised it does not come with a replica of the Twin Towers."

Many of the commenters at Amazon also complained that the Islamic chanting was extremely loud, and that the toy came with no way to turn it down. It seems as if whoever did this wanted to make sure that no one failed to notice their handiwork.

It's no accident that this would happen with a toy F-16 – after all, the F-16 is a famous American fighter jet. Someone in the company, most likely a Muslim, was against American "militarism" and clearly thought it would be funny, or make a political point, or both, to include this loud Islamic prayer. This could be a warning from Islamic jihadists, who like to boast that their prayers and piety will bring them a victory from Allah over American F-16s and other weaponry. Or it could be a leftist who thinks US airstrikes are wrong and wants to make the point that the "oppressed" will prevail. Either way, the police and the feds should investigate inside this toy company; hijacking and Islamizing toys may not be all they're up to.

Whatever is happening with the F-16, this has happened with toys before. In 2008, Mattel produced a doll that said, "Islam is the light." A Nintendo game in 2009 . Clearly, someone is targeting our nation's children with this subtle form of dawah.

Source

Pamela Geller's commitment to freedom from jihad and Shariah shines forth in her books

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