On my podcast this past Sunday, I discussed our genius Secretary of State John Kerry and his effort to not only get a deal done with Iran but that he hopes a successful Iranian deal will coax North Korea to negotiate yet another nuclear nonproliferation agreement - since the last one went so well.

I guess North Korea didn't get the memo because their leader, that pygmy, Kim Jong Un, has okayed the announcement on state-controlled TV that they have successfully miniaturized nuclear weapons to the point where they may now fit them onto missiles.

It's been known for years that North Korea possesses nuclear weapons and have detonated them three times. Once in 2006, once in 2009, and again in 2013. The nuke detonated in 2013 was said to be "smaller and lighter" than the previous two.

CNN writes:

"Fashioning a nuclear device small enough to fit on the tip of a ballistic missile is difficult. Miniaturizing a nuclear weapon is one key part of building a nuclear-armed intercontinental ballistic missile. But the nuke has to not only be miniaturized but more rugged. The nuclear device also needs to be tough enough to be able to withstand the flight on a ballistic missile, experts say, and be housed in a "reentry vehicle" that can endure the intense heat generated by coming back into Earth's atmosphere."

Sky News reports that the nuclear miniaturization announcement "came two weeks after North Korea said it had launched a ballistic missile from a submarine, allowing it to fire nuclear weapons far beyond the Korean peninsula."

There were even still photographs taken of the sub launch. First we see the pygmy on a boat with the sub in the background. Then we see a still shot of Kim pointing to a missile emerging from under the sea. We do not see the missile exiting the sub.

Yet some are skeptical of the validity of the photos. "German aerospace engineers Schmucker Technologie said photos of the 8 May launch were 'strongly modified', pointing out that reflections of the exhaust flame in the sea do not line up with the missile."

And the Obama administration is evidently not convinced, either. "Our assessment of North Korea's nuclear capabilities has not changed," National Security Council spokesman Patrick Ventrell said in a statement. "We do not think that they have that capacity. However, they are working on developing a number of long range missiles, including intercontinental ballistic missiles, that could eventually threaten our allies and the homeland."

Ventrell went on to say that they will continue "to work with the other members of the six-party talks to bring North Korea back into compliance with its nonproliferation commitments." I, for one, feel safer, particularly knowing that the talks will undoubtedly be headed up by the genius John Kerry.

However, South Korean military officials still believe the launch was authentic. "We haven't changed our stance that the rocket was fired from a submarine and flew about 150 metres out of the water," a South Korean military official said, "As we have previously said, the photos don't appear to have been manipulated."

And apparently not all Americans agree with our National Security Council.

"U.S. Army Gen. Curtis Scaparrotti, the commander of U.S. forces in Korea, said in October that he thought North Korea was capable of miniaturizing a nuclear device. And Adm. Bill Gortney, the commander of North American Aerospace Defense Command, told reporters last month that the U.S. military believed that Pyongyang could put a nuclear weapon on a road-mobile missile and "shoot it at the (U.S.) homeland."

I'm not sure what I believe regarding the claims coming out of North Korea. I know Kim Jong on is a whack job and makes outlandish exclamations, it seems, on a weekly basis - but the South Koreans are worried, as are two high-ranking U.S. military officers.

Kim may be crazy, but they have nuclear weapons and even a broken clock is correct twice a day.

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