There are two elements that are usually present in those young men who have been involved in mass shootings. The first thing is they are usually taking some kind of pharmaceutical drug and the other is that they are either fatherless or have a very distant or weak father.

In a recent episode of Afterburner with bill Whittle, he discusses this very important issue.

In addressing the recent shooting in Oregon, Whittle recounted the fact that Chris Harper Mercer's father had no idea about his son's ideology that would have led to the shooting nor did he know how he came to acquire 13 guns. Dad was completely out of the picture. Instead of him looking to his son as the perpetrator of the crime, he pointed to the guns. They are the killers, simple as that.

It's funny, I've never seen a gun grow legs, walk onto a college campus, aim itself and fire at unarmed people.

Whittle points out the Mercer's father is not alone in his belief the guns are the real killers. Whittle mockingly asks that if guns are the issue, then "What made these five guns go on a murder spree while at the same time almost 300 million other guns were peacefully resting or protecting their owners? Were these guns mistreated or mishandled in some way? Is that what caused then to snap and open fire?"

Obviously, these are ridiculous questions as were the ones that followed these, which Whittle put forward. "If that sounds ridiculous, it's because it is ridiculous," said Whittle.

Instead of going out on national television and showing yourself to be a buffoon and blaming inanimate objects for what your son did, Whittle said he would have gotten in his car and drove far away and sobbed for days, weeks, months and perhaps years in an attempt to relive the time he spent with his son in order to see where he had failed his son so badly.

In fact, he said that he would carry that failure as a father for the rest of his life. To add to that, he said any real father would do the same. I know I can concur with that type of thinking.

Of course, this is why anti-gunners want to blame the steel, because if it's the steel, then we don't have to deal with the person nor the consequences of our actions.

Whittle says the "great correlator" of violent prison inmates is not their economic background, race or the neighborhoods they came from. The one thing they have in common is that virtually all of them are fatherless boys.

Mr. Whittle warns that these kinds of boys will continue to keep coming in larger numbers as they seek the attention and validation that they did not receive from their absent or very weak fathers.

Whittle then references how the New York Times presents the modern man and what he is to be like. Among some of the more feminine qualities of the modern man is that he "has no use for a gun. He doesn't own one, and he never will."

"Does the modern man have a melon baller?" the NYT asks. "What do you think? How else would the cantaloupe, watermelon and honeydew he serves be so uniformly shaped?"

"The modern man makes sure the dishes on the rack have dried completely before putting them away," the piece goes on. "Having a daughter makes the modern man more of a complete person. He learns new stuff every day."

And finally, "The modern man cries. He cries often."

Frankly, most of this sounds more like those of the sodomite persuasion than men, though I do believe that even the most manly of men do cry at times, but I don't think often.

In any case, not one of the 27 things referenced true biblical parenting.

One must ask the question, what was different in the person of Christopher Mintz, an Army veteran who risked his life in an attempt to stop the shooter and Chris Mercer? Then one must ask about men like Spencer Stone, Alek Skarlatos and Anthony Sadler, who stood up to protect an entire French train full of men who cry often from an Islamic jihadist.

While liberals want to seek to keep Americans safe from such men who know how to use guns and other weapons, Whittle points out that America was not designed to be safe, it was designed to be free!

"You can have freedom without safety, or you can have freedom without safety," said Whittle.

"And," he added, "without the safety. There's no such thing as safety. Ask the families of those scores of kids who were gunned down on that remote island at the private school in Norway about safety," said Whittle referencing the murder of 77 people by the neo-Nazi Anders Behring Breivik.

"Safety is an illusion," Whittle explained. "It's a temporary bubble of psychological security provided by loving parents to protect children until they slowly become adult enough to face the reality of a dangerous world."

Whether one likes murder and insanity, doesn't stop either from occurring.

"The best efforts of effeminate, mincing, physical cowards sitting in sky scrapers in New York City to redefine manhood down to their pathetic level of weakness isn't going to stop murder and insanity," Whittle concludes. "It's only going to make it worse. Boys are turned into men by fathers who have the strength to set them on the difficult paths of honor, discipline, and mental toughness. That's where the real steel and the responsibility is or isn't. It's not in the closet full of inanimate objects which the left wants to throw into a volcano to appease the gods of murder and insanity that they themselves have done so much to create."

I think Bill Whittle is spot on. We fathers have to play a more active role in the rearing of our children than we have been doing both for their protection and the protection of others, as well as the glory of God.

As for mass shootings and pharmaceuticals, we've asked the question as to why these shootings aren't sparking a debate over the use of anti-depressants.

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