Yesterday, I wrote an article concerning the dramatic rise in youth pot smokers and how it may negatively affects acquiring employment.

Now, although experts agree that this is not necessarily a good thing, surely the medicinal uses for marijuana outweigh the potential negatives. After all, a full 23 states and the District of Columbia have legalized medical marijuana, and there's no way politicians would just accept the benefits of pot without hard scientific evidence - would they?

In 2014, Business Insider cited study after study and concluded that marijuana will slow the effects of Alzheimer's, stop the spread of cancer, reduce anxiety, treat glaucoma, treat MS, and on and on.

It seems medical marijuana is some kind of miracle drug - or is it?

Kim Janda of the Scripps research Institute suggests that "Marijuana may be able to slow the progression of Alzheimer's disease." The Canadian Medical Association Journal claims that "Marijuana may ease painful symptoms of multiple sclerosis," and "in 2010, researchers at Harvard Medical School suggested that some of the drugs benefits may actually be from reduced anxiety, which would improve the smokers moved and act as a sedative in low doses."

It may prevent cancer from spreading. It can prevent epileptic seizures… in rats, and it may slow the progression of glaucoma. Yet Business Insider was unable to cite a single study that definitively states marijuana does or will stop or slow anything. In every study, the caviat was that it may do something - or it may not.

They then admitted that "Currently only 6% of studies on marijuana analyze its medicinal properties."

Reuters wrote of a study regarding MS patients who use medical marijuana for spasticity, when the muscles in the legs and arms contract, "but the evidence that pot smoking actually helps with spasticity has been anecdotal."

"But another limitation," Dr. Jody Corey-Bloom pointed out, "is that the study looked at the effects and side effects, of marijuana over only a few days. We can't say anything about long-term effects."

So now that the medical marijuana train has already left the station, at least in 23 states and Washington DC, maybe science should catch up to all the wild claims about the wonders of pot.

Both the Daily Mail and the LA Times have released articles on this subject. The Daily Mail sites a University of Bristol study, testing the evidence from 79 different trials.

Their research found that "There is very little evidence to suggest cannabis can help ease the symptoms of a raft of illnesses, scientists have said. Medicinal cannabis has been legalized and 23 US states as a therapy to treat disease or alleviate symptoms, and a further seven states have legislation pending. A new study, in which scientists assessed the findings of 79 randomized trials including around 6500 volunteers, found the evidence supporting the use of medical cannabis is weak."

"Further studies evaluating cannabis itself are also required because there is very little evidence on the effects and adverse effects of cannabis. Dr. Deepak Cyril and Dr. Mohini Ranganathan, of Yale University said 'Since medical marijuana is not a life saving intervention, it may be prudent to wait before widely adopting its use until high quality evidence is available to guide the development of a rational approval process. Perhaps it is time to place the horse back in front of the cart.'" Fat chance of that happening.

The LA Times reports that "most uses of medical marijuana aren't supported by solid evidence from clinical trials, Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) review finds." Further, "a comprehensive review of dozens of clinical trials that have tested medical marijuana for 10 conditions finds that there's very little reliable evidence to support the drugs used. Trials testing the pain relieving effects of medical marijuana in people with fibromyalgia, HIV-associated sensory neuropathy, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis and other conditions did not show that it worked."

And, frankly, I was stunned that the liberal LA Times even allowed this next paragraph to be printed: "The results show that something is amiss in the 23 states (plus the District of Columbia) that allow the use of medical marijuana, according to the authors of an editorial that accompanies the JAMA review. The authors, from the Yale University School of Medicine, lamented the fact that state approval of medical marijuana had been based on 'low quality scientific evidence, anecdotal reports, individual testimonies, legislative initiatives, and public opinion. Imagine if other drugs were approved through a similar approach.'"

The article concludes with this admission by the researchers: "But that may not be the goal. If the states' initiative to legalize medical marijuana is merely a veiled step toward allowing access to recreational marijuana, then the medical community should be left out of the process…"

This is quite an admission from the scientific community, but I suppose until the medical marijuana lobby amasses as much money as the global warming folks, the researchers will stay true to real science. If and when we see these same researchers begin to adopt a pro-pot stance, we will know they've been bought off, similar to the global warming scientific hacks.

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