Last week, basketball great Kareem Abdul-Jabbar wrote a piece attempting to explain the violent jihad we see all over the globe, and he does a pretty fair job.

Jabbar, a Muslim, claims that the hijacking of Islam, his religion, isn't about religion at all. It's about what it's always about – money and power.

He says that, for him, "religion – no matter which one – is ultimately about people wanting to live humble, moral lives that create a harmonious community and promote tolerance and friendship with those outside the religious community. Any religious rules should be in service of this goal. The Islam I learned and practice does just that."

He says to "forget the goons who actually carry out these deadly acts, they are nothing more than automated drones remote controlled by others." Well, that's easier said than done, if it is your loved ones being slaughtered at a school, the workplace or on the street by these barbarians.

He cites the attacks on the Twin Towers and the most recent Paris incident. Jabbar says that these events didn't "frighten America into embracing Islam… they just strengthened our defiant resolve."

He says it's really all about these radical leaders, flexing their muscles in hopes of attracting more recruits and "more donations to keep their organization alive. They have to keep proving they are more relevant than their competing terrorist groups. It's just business."

If this is the case, could it then explain why each subsequent gang of radical Islamist thugs is more violent and bloodthirsty than the last? That's a possibility.

To his credit he goes on to explain that America's foreign policy is not to blame for this radical Islamic uprising. He says that we've made mistakes and "these mistakes" will be used as justification in recruiting new jihadists.

Jabbar says what makes America admirable is that despite not always doing the right things, we strive to. "We admit our faults and make adjustments. It may be glacial, but it's movement forward."

"Knowing that these terrorist attacks are not about religion, we have to reach a point where we stopped bringing Islam into these discussions," he insists.

And that's where we part ways. Although Jabbar made some valid points, particularly regarding the cowardly leaders of these various gangs wanting ever more power and influence, I find it hard to separate the two, and it will take millions of Jabbar's and leaders like Egypt's el-Sisi to convince me that this isn't about Islam, the religion.

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