On Monday, I wrote that Senator Rand Paul and others were to join with a protest against the House GOP tax deal on Wednesday sponsored by TheTeaParty.net. President of TheTeaParty.net Todd Cefaratti said that he had a message for both Republicans and Democrats as he said, “This is just the beginning. If you think the tea party’s dead, you ain’t seen nothing yet.”

In a press conference on Wednesday afternoon in the Capitol Hill Club in Washington, D.C., Cefarratti's organization, along with several House Republicans and Kentucky Senator Rand Paul decried the House GOP leadership for indicating that they were willing to cave on raising taxes to avert the fiscal cliff.

“The Republican Party is the party of limited government and low taxation. I don’t think it’s time to change who we are or what we stand for. Some have said this whole idea of pledging not to raise taxes is a bad idea. I disagree,” Paul said. “I ran on that platform and I was elected because the voters of Kentucky want less spending, limited government and less taxation. I know of no other way to stimulate the economy than to leave more money in the private sector. If you want to stimulate the economy in Louisville, Kentucky, you leave more money in Louisville, Kentucky. Until they cut out the waste, the fraud, the abuse and the nightmare spending up here, why would we ever consider as Republicans thinking about raising taxes?”

“Come to me when you’ve gotten rid of the $3 million you spent last year to watch monkeys on methamphetamine,” the Kentucky Senator continued. “Come to me when you get rid of the $300,000 you spent last year developing a robotic squirrel to see if a rattlesnake will strike a robotic squirrel that’s not wagging its tail – apparently they couldn’t get any real squirrels to volunteer and not wag their tails. They spent nearly a half a million dollars developing a ‘menu for Mars.’ If you don’t have a job and you’re looking for a job, this is a good one: You get to go to Hawaii, you have to like food, and you sit around for a week and you think of things you’d like to eat if you were on Mars. There’s also a $5,000 fee you get paid as well. Interestingly enough, after all of that, they think pizza would be good on Mars.”

Paul was not alone in his sentiments. Rep. Paul Broun (R-GA) said “I believe very firmly that we should not raise taxes on anybody for any reason. The government has too much money. It’s doing too much in the way of taking away our liberty. I believe in constitutional limited government as our Founding Fathers meant it. We’ve got to stop the spending. We need to send powers back to the states or the people, as the Tenth Amendment says it should be. We can balance the budget. We can stop this fiscal insanity that’s going on here in Washington without raising any more revenue."

Broun pushed the idea of closing wasteful departments in the federal government, much like what Texas Congressman Ron Paul put forth during the Republican primaries in 2012. He also spoke of instituting "real spending cuts."

“I want to get rid of wholesale parts of the federal government,” Broun said. “I want to get rid of the Department of Education, the Department of Commerce, the Department of Labor, and let’s get rid of the EPA while we’re doing it. Let’s really cut spending.”

Rep. Louie Gohmert (R-TX) blasted back against the Democrats' rhetoric that the Republicans are just out to help their rich friends. “Well, I don’t have a lot of rich friends,” he said. “That is not what we’re about. We’re about trying to protect the principles on which this country was founded. We don’t want to protect the rich. We want to get back to a system where anybody in America can get rich.”

The issue really comes down to fiscal responsibility and not raising taxes on anyone. Rep. John Fleming (R-LA) writes in an op-ed piece at the Washington Times:

In the past 100 years, since the authority of Congress to tax income was enumerated in the 16th Amendment, marginal income tax rates have never been raised when Republicans have held the majority in the House of Representatives. For nearly a century, Republican-controlled Houses held the line on tax rates, a Republican coup de pointe to Democratic tax-increase parries. Here’s the question for my fellow Republicans: Do we want to be the first-ever GOP House majority to raise federal marginal income tax rates?

The federal power to tax income was made part of the U.S. Constitution with the ratification of the 16th Amendment in February 1913. What you may not know is that it was a Republican-controlled Congress that passed the 16th Amendment in 1909. It did so as an act of political posturing that backfired. A year later, Republicans were crushed in the elections of 1910. They lost control of the House and lost 12 seats in the Senate.

“If he [Boehner] caves [on fiscal cliff negotiations], he’s going to have to get it passed with a lot of Democrat votes,” Fleming told Breitbart News after the press conference. “So, just like with the continuing resolutions, there’s anywhere from 40 to 80 to even 100 members on the conservative side who just simply vote against it, so it [a deal] gets passed only with Democrat help.”

Fleming said he doesn’t “sense” a movement coming against Boehner from the right. “While the Speaker may be less conservative than me, I’m not sure he’s less conservative than the caucus as a whole,” Fleming said. “I’ve never seen a measurement of where we fall. I know I’m to the right of the Speaker. But, there are people [in the House Republican conference] who actually fall to the left of the Speaker. His [Boehner’s] job is to move that dial back and forth until he gets 218 votes, even if he has to go to Democrats to get it.”

Sen. Paul said that instead of coming out with real reform for entitlement plans to trim those expenditures, "we come out as the party that’s for raising taxes just a little bit less."

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