This is one for the books. A student art project on display at a municipal building in Denver, Colorado is now the focus of race-based controversy.

The Wellington E. Webb Municipal Office Building in Denver (which serves as a central location for over 50 City agencies and was completed in 2002) is named after Wellington E. Webb, who became Denver’s first black mayor in 1991.

A Denver Public Schools student was apparently “inspired” to create a piece of art to be featured at the municipal building, along with other students’ art projects. This one depicted a police officer in a Ku Klux Klan hood pointing a gun at a black child.

The piece was then put on display in the Webb building.

According to Denver Mayor Michael Hancock’s office, the piece began to draw negative commentary, at which point the student asked that the piece be taken down – which is probably the best idea she had all month.

Hancock’s office said that “it values the voices of young artists, but also respects the officers who serve and protect the community,” as a rationale for complying with the student’s request to have the piece taken down.

Which sounds perfectly reasonable to me.

I think it’s great that municipalities feature the artwork of local students, but let’s get to the real problem here, and that’s why the student was motivated to craft such a dark piece of work in the first place. Could it be because the public schools in our nation, and particularly those in major cities, inculcate into young minds the notion that racist police fancy harassing and murdering black children for fun and profit?

This makes sense, since public school educators and administrators and municipal officials (such as those who opted to feature the student’s piece of art) tend to be cut from the same obsequious, arrogant, race-baiting cloth.

The student artwork in question is indeed rather macabre, but it would be more in keeping with something a student might have created in 1966 rather than 2016. And to answer my own question; yes, children in America are being raised to believe that their country is still an institutionally racist nation. This modality went into high gear on the day Barack Hussein Obama took office as our president, because not only did career radicals and militants know that he was a kindred spirit, but his administration has both encouraged and facilitated black militancy and fostered racial tension.
It’s racialism, not racism, that is the problem in America. It must be eradicated, but that won’t happen until we cut the head off of the snake – and that snake is socialism.

For a more comprehensive look at how the political left has deceived and exploited blacks for decades, one might consider Negrophilia: From Slave Block to Pedestal – America’s Racial Obsession.

Article reposted with permission from

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