One wonders what in the World the RNC is doing in naming the participants giving speeches at the Republican National Convention and why certain people aren't being allowed to speak. Apparently Team Romney is running the show and they only want people on the platform that have kissed the ring of the presumptive nominee.

The Tampa Bay Times confirmed several speakers:

Florida Gov. Rick Scott, Sen. John McCain and former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice are among seven headline speakers announced today for the Republican National Convention in Tampa.

The first look at featured speakers also includes South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley, former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee, Ohio Gov. John Kasich and New Mexico Gov. Susana Martinez.

The keynote speaker and others will be named closer to the Aug. 27-30 event, Republican National Committee chairman Reince Priebus said in announcing the headliners, whom he called "some of our party's brightest stars, who have governed and led effectively and admirably in their respective roles."

RNC Chairman Reince Priebus said that these are " some of our party’s brightest stars, who have governed and led effectively and admirably in their respective roles."

Rick Santorum also wants the opportunity to address the convention. Santorum was running a strong race before dropping out due to an illness that his daughter is suffering from. Santorum had quite a bit of support as well at the time he dropped out. While he did endorse Romney, he did so reluctantly. It was quite ironic knowing that Santorum was endorsing someone that he had said was "the worst candidate" the Republicans could put up against Obama.

What about Sarah Palin? Obviously if there is someone who excites the base of the Republican party it's Palin. She's currently 4 for 5 in her support of candidates running for election this year and is always a favorite on television and at speaking engagements. So far though, she is not in the mix.

There are lots of people that should be addressing the convention. Earlier this week Senator Rand Paul (R-KY0 was confirmed to address the convention.

Ron Paul has obviously stayed in the race and has a large number of supporters, yet his son is confirmed and presumably because of his endorsement, while he has neither endorsed the presumptive nominee or abandoned his message. Paul will also have as many as 5-600 delegates and alternates at the convention. Finally, the man has had a plurality of delegates in at least five states as reported by the national media. That should actually give him time and put his name on the ballot.

The CATO Institute advised that Republican candidates would do well to recognize and respect the undeniable electoral influence of the liberty caucus of the GOP. In its report titled Libertarian Roots of the Tea Party David Kirby and Emily McClintock Ekins write,

Libertarians led the way for the tea party. Starting in early 2008 through early 2009, we find that libertarians were more than twice as "angry" with the Republican Party, more pessimistic about the economy and deficit since 2001, and more frustrated that people like them cannot affect government than were conservatives. Libertarians, including young people who supported Ron Paul's 2008 presidential campaign, provided much of the early energy for the tea party and spread the word through social media.

Understanding the tea party's strong libertarian roots helps explain how the tea party movement has become a functionally libertarian influence on the Republican Party. Most tea partiers have focused on fiscal, not social, issues — cutting spending, ending bailouts, reducing debt, and reforming taxes and entitlements — rather than discussing abortion or gay marriage. Even social conservatives and evangelicals within the tea party act like libertarians. The tea party is upending the conventional wisdom that Republican candidates must placate socially conservative voters to win primaries.

Increasingly, Republican candidates must win over tea party voters on libertarian economic issues.

To the extent the Republican Party becomes functionally libertarian, focusing on fiscal over social issues, the tea party deserves much credit — credit that political strategists, scholars, and journalists have yet to fully give.

In other words, if you are member of the Tea Party, which is a true grass roots movement, then you need to realize who planted the grass. It wasn't Mitt Romney. It wasn't the GOP establishment. It was libertarians in the GOP and the father of that idea was Ron Paul.

Seriously, to let someone like John McCain address the convention is utterly revolting. The man has shown himself to be nothing more than a RINO. He supported NDAA. He supported the stifling of free speech in the "campaign finance reform" he crafted with a Democrat and above all he wouldn't even stand up and be a conservative in 2008. Yet this is a man Romney and the GOP want to address the convention?

The GOP seriously need to rethink how they play this. Should they decide to completely exile Ron Paul and his supporters, along with other popular GOP speakers what does that say for the Republican party? What does it say for the Romney campaign?

UPDATE:
Ted Cruz and Gov. Scott Walker of Wisconsin have now been confirmed to speak at the convention as well, along with Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi, Puerto Rico Governor Luis Fortuno and Georgia Attorney General Sam Olens.

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