I'd heard that "an Ivy League professor" said on a social media venue that GOP presidential hopeful Ben Carson should win "coon of the year" after he advocated allowing Confederate battle flags to be displayed at NASCAR events. Then, I heard that said Ivy League professor was none other than University of Pennsylvania religious studies professor Anthea Butler.

Remember Anthea Butler? She's the one who claims that "America's God" is a white racist, and who called former Ferguson, Missouri, cop Darren Wilson an emissary of "America's racist god" for shooting 18-year-old Michael Brown to death in August of 2014 – just because Brown beat the officer into near-insensibility and attempted to relieve him of his service pistol.

It's sad that the designation "Ivy League professor" has been reduced in practical terms to something on a par with "crack whore," but then there is at least some humor in a morbidly obese affirmative-action sideshow exhibit having the temerity to insult someone whose curriculum vitae, talent, accomplishments and intellect preclude her stooping to tie his sandals, so to speak, assuming Butler has the ability to stoop at all.

In context, the danger is that altogether too many black Americans share Butler's sentiments.

I spent some time with my friend C.L. Bryant on his radio show discussing Butler's remark about Carson. When C.L. asked me on-air what I thought, the first thing that came to mind was how uncouth an individual had to be to sink to the level of employing that sort of invective publicly. I mean … "coon?"

Butler might have at least attempted to muster enough class to come up with a more refined idiom – like "darky," perhaps.

This led us to the inevitable discussion of the double standard that exists vis-à-vis liberals having unconstrained and exclusive license to employ racist invective with impunity. Obviously, no prominent white conservative could get away with the unapologetic use of racial epithets in reference to Al Sharpton (who sort of ran for president once), yet liberal politicians both black and white, entertainers, commentators and so-called educators do so with regularity in referencing black conservatives.

Last weekend, the 20th anniversary of the Million Man March was commemorated in Washington, D.C., in front of the Capitol, led by Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan, who organized both the original 1995 march and this year's offering, themed "Justice or Else."

I'll leave the implications of that phrase to the reader.

In a tedious, disjointed oratory liberally peppered with references to slavery and William Lynch (1742–1820; he is generally accepted as the source of the term "lynching"), Farrakhan went from reminding the audience of their own sins before God and that a person is not truly "liberated" until they can forgive, to analogizing the lives of black Americans in 2015 to that of plantation slaves and calling for decisive action to free them from that "bondage."

In truth, white Marxists started this fire, and white liberals enrolled blacks into the belief that they are entitled to be perpetually embittered for past injustices. Whites and nonwhites of good conscience but little nerve allowed the fire to become a conflagration by failing to extinguish it.

It is profoundly disturbing that a foul creature like Louis Farrakhan is seen as a genuine advocate by many black Americans. It is sickening that caricatures such as Anthea Butler are advanced professionally and accepted as legitimate educators. It is perverse that entertainers like Kanye West and Azealia Banks are granted forums to disparage this nation after making fortunes here as purveyors of malignant art.

It is reprehensible that New England universities and private boarding schools run by gutless ideologues are hiring a bigoted, opportunistic moron like DeRay McKesson as a lecturer – a man who defends blacks looting in the course of public demonstration and who attempted to engender antipathy against police by libeling them relative to the case of a 12-year-old boy who was killed by cops in Cleveland last year.

And it is infuriating that 90 percent of black Americans continue to help sustain and pledge fealty to the very agencies that perpetuate all of the above.

I have long considered the possibility that orchestrated rioting among blacks nationwide may ultimately be the pretext for Barack Hussein Obama implementing martial law in the United States. Having accomplished this, he could effectively dispatch the most potentially threatening sources of resistance to his malevolent agenda in an atmosphere that would afford him the least possible scrutiny.

Everything referenced here is helping to set the stage for this eventuality.

The catalyst will be a violent clash between someone of color and a white individual, most likely a member of law enforcement. For the regime's purposes, it will be best if the former party is killed in the confrontation. As with events in the recent past, the racial component will be overplayed if not fabricated outright; blame and charges of racism will fall on the white party or parties or, once again, on law enforcement as a whole.

Failing to identify a suitable incident to exploit within their elusive nominal time frame (which is unlikely but certainly conceivable), Obama may have some of his surrogate community organizers, crisis actors and sundry criminals simply stage a particularly nasty one. America will erupt, the left will wail piteously for salvation from on high (their cries amplified exponentially by the press), and forces across the nation will be mobilized by a seemingly stunned and distressed president.

Then, my fellow Americans, as the late Karl Malden used to intone forebodingly in that old commercial for traveler's checks: "What will you do?"

"What … will … you … do?"

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