I was speaking to the father of one of my sons' best friends the other day. As it turns out, the father is also one of my close friends. His older son is graduating high school and will be heading off to college in a few months. He wishes to study aeronautic engineering, and schools that specialize in this field are pretty pricey.

He told me that he is too wealthy to be poor and too poor to be wealthy. In other words, he's just above the threshold for his son to qualify for low income assistance, so student loans are what they are left with. And that's okay. He doesn't expect anyone else to pay for his son's education.

It's just a shame that his son isn't an illegal alien. I suggested he and his son fly down to Tijuana, Mexico, drop him off, have the kid walk across the border, claim DREAMer status, and he'll be all set.

If, we'll call him Julio, picks the right state and the right school, he's virtually home free. And if he needs help in how to achieve this, he may read a US News article from 2014 entitled "How Immigrants without Legal Status Can Pay for College."

Notice they are careful to describe them as immigrants without legal status, rather than what they are - illegals. Only once, in this relatively lengthy post is the word illegal mentioned.

Good news for Julio - for the article begins by stating that "Scholarships, state aid and tuition payment plans can help make college a financial reality for some immigrant students."

To start, 18 states allow illegals to pay in-state tuition and "students living in California, Texas, New Mexico, Minnesota and Washington are also eligible for state-based financial aid…"

Uh-oh, Rick Perry - weren't you Gov. of Texas for quite a long time? Hmmm. Your state has been doling out aid to illegals for almost a decade.

Anyway, there is a key to getting free money from the American taxpayers, according to Alejandra Rincon, author of Undocumented Students and Higher Education: Si Se Puede.

"It's important for students to be informed and persistent. Bottom line, if they are in a state that has in-state tuition, the key thing is to not take no for an answer," Rincon says.

There are also organizations, like "United We Dream" and "Educators for Fair Consideration" which "publish resources for students without legal status." And it gets better. DreamUS is a "$32 million scholarship fund established in February 2014, which awards scholarships of up to $25,000 to immigrant students with temporary resident status."

States also have their own DREAM funds, like the Illinois Dream fund. It's good that Illinois can do this, being that as of 2014, their total state debt was only $321 billion.

So Julio might be in good shape, and, if he's lucky, he may achieve what Cesar Vargas of New York (by way of somewhere other than the United States) did. He is "the Empire State's first undocumented immigrant to gain a law license after an Appeals Court, Wednesday found 'no legal impediment or rational basis for withholding the privilege of practicing law in the state of New York from undocumented immigrants who have been granted DACA [Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals] relief."

Well that's great! We need another attorney in America. I wonder what type of law he will specialize in. "As a lawyer, I'm going to have more power to help people to confront and fix broken legal systems that our community faces every day," he says.

Wow - couldn't have seen that one coming. So Vargas is still technically an illegal alien, who now has a license to practice law in the state of New York, to advocate and harass the American legal system, and to allow more illegals in, give them free stuff and an education, so they can become lawyers to advocate for more illegals.

Awesome! How stupid are we?

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