“People like Frank Gaffney and Pam Geller pushed anti-Muslim sentiment during the incessant right-wing media coverage over the so-called ‘9/11 mosque’ a proposed Islamic community center in lower Manhattan near the World Trade Center.”

Ellison is flagrantly dishonest and is attempting to rewrite history. Few people, if any, on either side of the issue ever referred to the Ground Zero Mosque as the “9/11 mosque.” And it wasn’t just “near the World Trade Center,” it was going to be built on the site of a building that had been extensively damaged in the 9/11 attacks — part of Ground Zero. It would have been viewed worldwide as a triumphal mosque built on the site of a jihad victory, like the Dome of the Rock and the al-Aqsa Mosque on the Temple Mount, the Hagia Sophia (a converted church) in Istanbul, and thousands of others around the world. And Ellison leaves out the most salient fact: we beat that cynical and sinister project.

Above all, Ellison is not only wrong, but mendacious in saying that I “pushed anti-Muslim sentiment.” It’s “anti-Muslim” to be against jihad terror? A telling admission, Congressman. But if Ellison really wants to complain about the people who have “pushed anti-Muslim sentiment,” he shouldn’t be talking about me and Ted Cruz and Ben Carson. He should be talking about Nidal Malik Hasan, and Dzhokhar and Tamerlan Tsarnaev, and Syed Rizwan Farouk and Tashfeen Malik, and Ibrahim Simpson and Nadir Soofi, and tens of thousands of other jihad terrorists who have murdered and raped and destroyed so many lives in the cause of Allah: they are the primary purveyors of “anti-Muslim sentiment.”

That Ellison would attack me and other defenders of freedom instead of them is telling. It shows which side he is really on. On Ellison’s ties to the Muslim Brotherhood, see here.

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“I’m the first Muslim in Congress. I believe America can beat Islamophobia.” by Keith Ellison, Washington Post, September 10, 2016 (thanks to Jamie):

…When I first came to Congress after 9/11, I certainly faced challenges: Glenn Beck asked me to prove I wasn’t working with our nation’s enemies; Rep. Virgil Goode (R-Va.) warned his constituents that unless America supported his exclusive vision of immigration, there would be “many more Muslims elected to office and demanding the use of the Quran.” But I took these things in stride because I expected negative reactions from some people to the first Muslim congressman.

Now, I’m no longer sure those reactions are receding. Indeed, things are still challenging for America’s Muslim community, as we face down lies and fear mongering about our faith — by the presidential nominee for the Republican Party, no less. Anti-Muslim hate speech used to be limited to the fringe. But over time, because of well-financed advocacy, these ugly views have crept into the mainstream.

People like Frank Gaffney and Pam Geller pushed anti-Muslim sentiment during the incessant right-wing media coverage over the so-called “9/11 mosque” a proposed Islamic community center in lower Manhattan near the World Trade Center. It morphed into members of Congress advocating for McCarthy-like tactics for Muslims working in our government. And it has culminated with a Republican presidential nomination race that included Sen. Ted Cruz appointing Gaffney to be one of his closest advisers, Ben Carson saying a Muslim should never become president, and the nomination of a man who said Muslims should not be allowed to enter our country. What used to be whispered through a dog whistle is now being screamed through a bullhorn….

Article reposted with permission from PamelaGeller.com

Pamela Geller's commitment to freedom from jihad and Shariah shines forth in her books

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