Individuals in the Obama administration just can't seem to stop with the lying and constant propaganda. The latest individual to grace the lame stream enemedia with falsehoods was none other than General Keith Alexander, head of the National Security Agency. Alexander appeared on Fox News yesterday defending the NSA's collection of metadata on millions of innocent Americans.

In an interview with Fox News' Bret Baier, Alexander denied accusations that the NSA is listening to phone calls and reading email, an accusation made by former President Jimmy Carter. Carter stated he had reverted to write letters instead of emails due to a concern that the NSA is reading the electronic correspondence. According to Alexander, "Well, we're not. So he can now go back to writing emails. The reality is we don't do that. And, if we did, it would be illegal, and we would be found – I think, held accountable and responsible."

Maybe Alexander's memory is fading a bit since it was discovered that NSA agents were monitoring and listening to calls between service members and their families made through Skype. In fact, the NSA agents were particularly interested in the more "romantic" virtual communications. Would it be far-fetched to think emails would be reviewed?

Alexander even had the nerve to defend James Clapper, Director of National Intelligence, about the lie told to Congress concerning the mass surveillance of Americans. Alexander stated, "I think he made a mistake, and he has admitted that. Here's a guy, Director Clapper, who worked for 50 years for the good of his country. He makes one mistake, and we crucify him."

It appears Alexander believes perjury is just a mistake, and all should be rosy if you just admit it. Alexander must not be familiar with the punishment for perjury should a regular American be caught lying in a court of law or to a law enforcement officer. No judge would give the average commoner a pass because it was a mistake, and the person admitted it. So, here we go with the one rule for us, another for you spiel – the law is only law when the elite decides it is.

Naturally, Alexander is "disheartened" with the criticism his agency receives for their unlawful spying, particularly the political opposition to the agency's "above reproach" program. Alexander particularly addressed the opposition voiced by Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul who has called the NSA's behavior unconstitutional. General Alexander's response sounds close to the words of Frau "they don't know what I know" Feinstein.

"Knowing what we do – if you talk to members of Congress they will tell you that we're doing the right thing here. From my perspective, we aren't doing anything illegal. And if we do, we'll be the first to catch it and report it," said Alexander.

Of Rand Paul, Alexander stated, "He ought to come up here and meet the people. Some of them are from his state. And I'll tell you that these are the people, the noble people. I'd rather have this conversation today than to have been sitting here answering why we didn't stop a terrorist attack."

To date, the most recent reports indicate the massive data collection by the NSA has done absolutely nothing to prevent any form of terrorism.

Somehow, Alexander is missing the limitation placed on government in the Fourth Amendment of the Constitution. These metadata collections perpetrated against the American citizens are basically warrantless. Records are being seized unreasonable, without probable cause or listing particular persons or effects to be seized. Add to that, these broad, over-reaching requests for data collection are done in a secret court that gives carte blanche to the agency presenting the request. There is no opposition or upholding of individual rights against this encroachment in that secret court.

Alexander's agency is already participating in authorized illegal behavior, with very little oversight, since Congress seems to support the violation of the Constitution. No one should believe that an agency participating in this type of activity would be able to police itself to catch impropriety much less report it. Didn't it take a civilian contractor sneaking out documents, fleeing to another country and become labeled a traitor by his own government for exposing this illegal activity?

Which particular state a NSA employee considers their home state should make no difference whatsoever to anyone. Regardless of Alexander's view of these being "the noble people," did some of these same employees use their position to spy and keep up with girlfriends, wives, significant others to determine faithfulness? Yes, they did, and it was reported in various news outlets because of documents released by Edward Snowden. For certain, these are the noble people. Evidently this was not considered wrong-doing or illegal, or the NSA would have caught it themselves, then reported it. Alexander must also believe these "nobles," like Clapper, made a mistake. So, as long as they admit it everything is rosy.

It has been exposed the NSA spied and collected data on innocent citizens of other sovereign nations, unbeknownst to them, violating their privacy without any probable cause. Again, according to Alexander, this agency has done nothing illegal and are doing the right thing.

The reality is no one knows exactly what the NSA does or does not do when it comes to reading or reviewing any of the information that is collected. All anyone knows is what this mouth piece for the administration states and who has been caught in lies himself. Congress naturally approves of all this illegal information gathering as long as it's not directed at them. The American public has no trust, respect or confidence at this point in Congress. Alexander made a straw man argument by throwing around Congress' support for this invasion of privacy that has done nothing to stem any terrorist activity.

With all this data collection, one would think the NSA would have known about the Boston Bombers or the attack on Benghazi beforehand in order to intervene. Alas, that did not happen because that is not the true intent of this data collection. The true intent is still hidden from those who are affected by this pig in a silk dress. No matter how many times this administration changes the dress on the pig, it's still a pig with those who participate in this illegal, unconstitutional program on any level claiming "nobility" in their endeavors. One should be able to deduce that invading the privacy of an innocent individual, without probable cause or indication of wrong-doing, is anything but noble, if you were brought up with and taught any kind of values at all.

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