Warning: This article contains graphic imagery

The Mexican foreign ministry has launched a formal protest in response to Governor Rick Perry’s decision to send Texas National Guard Troops to the southern border.

According to a head-scratching statement released by Mexico, there is apparently no border security problem and the State of Texas has grossly overreacted.

Mexico “reiterates, in a firm and categorical way, its rejection of this measure,” read a statement from the foreign ministry.

“No circumstance at all or change in border security exists that justifies this measure taken by the state.”

The troop deployment “does not contribute in any way to solving the immigration problem,” and is inconsistent with US-Mexico talks aimed at “building a modern, prosperous and safe border,” the statement read.

Governor Rick Perry called up 1,000 Texas National Guard Troops in an effort to curb the flow of illegal immigrants into the state. Several dozen troops began arriving in the Rio Grande Valley last week as part of the state’s Joint Counterdrug Task Force.

While Mexican officials may protest and propagandize the situation, the evidence is clear. There has been a significant change in the circumstances on our southern border in recent months and tens of thousands of migrants, including criminal drug cartel and gang members, have made their way into the United States. Moreover, the Mexican government itself is facilitating the mass migrations.

(Pictured: The Beast train transports thousands of immigrants to crossing points on the southern border)

(Pictured: The Beast train transports thousands of immigrants to crossing points on the southern border)

The foreign ministry says that they want to create a safe and prosperous border, yet some 70,000 people have been violently killed in Mexican border cities in the last 6 years as part of the ongoing drug war.

Is this what the ministry means when they say they want to build a modern and prosperous border region?

And while Mexico may be negotiating with the U.S. government about how to best handle immigration policy, to suggest that deploying Texas National Guard Troops does not “contribute in any way” to solving the immigration problem” is patently ridiculous.

Perhaps it doesn’t solve the problem of how Mexican officials can move thousands of people into the United States illegally, but it certainly helps to slow down the migration from America’s perspective.

(Pictured: Extreme drug cartel violence often includes the slaughter of innocent men, women and children)

(Pictured: Extreme drug cartel violence often includes the slaughter of innocent men, women and children)

Up until recently a sparse group of Border Patrol agents were stretched out across the border. Now, those attempting to cross over will be faced with a more formidable force:

(Pictured: Texas National Guard troops assemble on southern border)

(Pictured: Texas National Guard troops assemble on southern border)

We have militarized federal law enforcement agents who have been tasked with securing internal travel points throughout the United States.

Maybe it’s time we send the heavy firepower down south instead:

(Pictured: Armed National Guard Troops secure the U.S.-Mexico Border)

(Pictured: Armed National Guard Troops secure the U.S.-Mexico Border)

The irony in the statement from the foreign ministry is apparent in the following photo, which shows a Mexican border patrol agent guarding a river access point from illegal immigration on Mexico’s southern border with Guatemala:

(Photo: Armed Mexican border patrol stands guard on Guatemalan border [link])

(Photo: Armed Mexican border patrol stands guard on Guatemalan border [link])

Despite the protests from Mexico, there is only one way to ensure the security of the U.S. border from foreign threats and it involves utilizing our military in the same way that the Mexican government is utilizing their military on their own southern border.

Source

Don't forget to Like Freedom Outpost on Facebook, Google Plus, & Twitter. You can also get Freedom Outpost delivered to your Amazon Kindle device here.