A new study in the Journal of Climate Science warns that decades long drought may become the norm for the southwestern United States.

"A drier Southwest is also a Southwest at risk of a megadrought," said study author Toby Ault, a climate scientist at Cornell University.

Of course, the study implicates global warming as the cause of these future droughts, it does not take into account the planet hasn't actually warmed at all since 1998. Publications from around the world have published articles relating to the hiatus in global warming. You can read some of them herehere, and hereThis article, by the eminent climate scientist Prof Don Easterbrook gives a full explanation of not only the end, for now of global warming, but how the planet is actually cooling at the moment.

The Journal of climate science study only takes into account precipitation, and even with that it deals with the averages in recent years. It makes no account for years of mammoth snowfall, or years of years of above average rainfall. Finally, it makes no reference at all to the cycles the Earth is proven to go through.

Back in the 1970′s, scientists were screaming that a new ice age was upon us…they were of course wrong. The planet goes through cycles of warming and cooling and this is what's happening now, it has always happened and it will continue to happen.

There is no doubt that the climate does from time to time experience a flip in a short space of time, a decade or so rather than the thousands of years usually associated with a major climate shift.

Ice core analysis has proven this. Richard Alley is a world expert on ice core analysis and has proven that abrupt climate change has happened several times before.

As the world slid into and out of the last ice age, the general cooling and warming trends were punctuated by abrupt changes. Climate shifts up to half as large as the entire difference between ice age and modern conditions occurred over hemispheric or broader regions in mere years to decades.

Such abrupt changes have been absent during the few key millennia when agriculture and industry have arisen. The speed, size, and the extent of these abrupt changes required a reappraisal of climate stability.

Records of these changes are especially clear in high-resolution ice cores. Ice cores can preserve histories of local climate (snowfall, temperature), regional (wind-blown dust, sea salt, etc.), and broader (trace gases in the air) conditions, on a common time scale, demonstrating synchrony of climate changes over broad regions.  Richard B. Alley (source)

The study gives no consideration to the activity on the Sun and how it relates to climate science. As I said, it gives no consideration to much at all except past precipitation figures.

This is just another example of the corporate machine at work. Grants are hard to come by these days and it seems that some scientists are happy to miss out large chunks of information to support the government stance on global warming…sorry, climate change.

If you notice governments stopped referring to global warming some considerable time ago, they had to because they knew the planet was not warming, hence, the term climate change was born.

This constant re-enforcement that something is happening when in actual fact it is not, is perpetuated by western governments to extract 'green' tax payments from businesses and citizens alike.

This money, billions and billions of dollars is supposedly being used to invest in renewable energy systems. Well where are all of these wind farms and tidal batteries and solar arrays? Why does almost all our generated electricity come from an ailing and due to collapse power grid?

Climate change is nothing new. It has been happening for millions of years and it will continue until the planet is no more.

The Earth is dynamic and ever-changing and climate change is nothing more than part of the nature of the planet.

Source

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