We teach children that it is not only okay to be wacky and different, but it is to be celebrated. Don't try to conform, fit in, or assimilate. If it makes you "feel" better to get a neck tattoo at the age of 8, you should do that – or a nose ring – or dress up like a little girl. If it improves your self-esteem or your perceived self-worth, then we should be all for it.

For decades now, we've packed up our children and sent them off to liberal indoctrination camps posing as public schools.

When someone dares to promote something as sensible as school uniforms, they are practically run out of town on a rail. We can't have uniforms, it is said. That will stifle the children's creativity and will not allow them to express their individualism.

We allow them to learn that 2 + 2 can equal five so that we don't damage children's fragile psyche. Heather having two daddies is the same as a mommy and daddy, and that should never be thought of as different or out of the mainstream. Teachers no longer use red ink to correct assignments, assuming there are any assignments, because that's far too aggressive and may be yet another damaging blow to the child's self-esteem. We wouldn't want them to feel bad or inferior to other children.

In sports, every child gets a ribbon or a trophy just for showing up, and we've decided to eliminate the practice of honoring top-achieving students as "valedictorian" or "salutatorian," because it promotes unhealthy competition.

So kids have spent their whole lives in this insane, out-of-touch-with-reality environment.

Then it's off to University, where, we'll call her Janey, is taught in her radical feminist class that all men are predators and you'll never break through the glass ceiling.

Little, we'll call him Vester, learns in his African studies course that the sole purpose of all white men is to keep the brother down. To them, being black is a license to be offended by everything.

Then little Vester or Janey leave the safe harbor of academia or their parents' home and strike out into the real world, where no one gives a rat's behind about their individual expression, propping up their self-esteem, or their desire to make a statement celebrating their uniqueness. Employers don't care if you're black, white, or green. They don't care if you're male or female, hetero or homosexual. They have but one concern: can you do the job you are asked to do? If you can – great. If you can't – sucks to be you, and there's the door.

Those in the real world have not the time, the patience, nor the desire to coddle you or care about propping up your sagging self-esteem.

Unfortunately, now that they're adults, they, who have experienced nothing but false adulation from parents, teachers, coaches, and councilors, have zero capacity to handle rejection or disappointment.

Children who have grown up in a self-esteem-is-everything environment, have no capacity to handle real adversity. And so we should not be surprised when someone from that environment lashes out and does something horrific to others or to themselves.

Anything that has gone wrong in his or her lives is the fault of someone else. They have no capacity for self-reflection or constructive criticism.

Couple this with the fact that they live their entire lives on Facebook and Twitter, where all they see, all they witness, is one good time after another – happy smiling selfies with lots of friends packed into one picture.

They see constant Facebook updates of how much better everyone else's life is than their own. Every day they get another alert that someone updated their Facebook status with yet another fun picture – another reminder that everyone else's life is better than theirs.

But one would think, when you get to a certain age, it's time to stop blaming others. But this is evidently not the case for someone like Vester Flanagan II, the Virginia shooter, who had to be hauled out of the TV station where he worked. He had evidently never grown up. Despite his age, 41, he had remained an angry, chronically offended man.

WDBJ general manager Jeffrey Marks described Flanagan as someone "difficult to work with. He was sort of looking out for people to say things he could take offense to," Marks said in an interview that aired on the station. "After many incidents of his anger coming to the floor, we dismissed him. He did not take that well; we had to call police to escort him from the building."

I'd like to say that Vester Flanagan II is unique, but I fear he's not. He may only be unique in his age, but honestly, liberal America has been inculcating these angry, put-upon people since the sixties. And it will only get worse the more we coddle them.

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