When speaking to students at the University of Tennessee College of Law (UTCL) annual Rose Lecture, Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia said that Americans "should revolt" if income taxes become too high.

Scalia pointed out that while the federal government has the right to tax the citizens, "if it reaches a certain point perhaps you should revolt."

The Supreme Court Justice explained to the students: "You're entitled to criticize the government, and you can use words, you can use symbols, you can use telegraph, you can use Morse code, you can burn a flag."

Scalia asserted that he adheres to originalism and he believes that "the Constitution is not a living organism for Pete's sake. It's a law. It means what it meant when it was adopted."

Scalia recently told the National Press Club (NPC) at a joint appearance with fellow Justice Ruth Bader Ginsberg, that "the Framers would have been appalled" by the 1964 ruling of the New York Times v. Sullivan because it "was revising the Constitution."

This case established the standard that for a media outlet to be sued for libel, the bringer of the suit must prove that the statements were published with actual malice or reckless disregard for the truth; as well as factually incorrect.

At the NPC, Scalia also commented on whether the Supreme Court would rule on the National Security Agency (NSA) surveillance programs.

The Supreme Court Justice said that "the court is not the best body to decide major national security issues because of its lack of expertise."

However, Scalia intimated that the Supreme Court "would likely decide the issue of whether widespread gathering of telecommunications data violates the Fourth Amendment, which bars unlawful searches and seizures."


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