The exact argument I was making with regards to a small government approach to protecting public schools, though personally I'm against public education, seems like it is pretty popular with public school employees in Ohio. The approach I presented was to remove "Gun Free Zones" and allow people, including school officials to simply exercise their Second Amendment rights in order to be a means to protect children and others around them. Reports are that more than 450 teachers and other school employees in the State of Ohio have applied for 24 spots in a firearms-training program that is being offered by Buckeye Firearms Association.

According to The Columbus Dispatch,

“We’re pleasantly surprised, but it’s not shocking,” Ken Hanson, legal chairman for the association, said today of the response since the group began taking applications on its website 10 days ago. “The demand has been there for quite some time.”

The issue of arming school employees to protect students has been “on the radar” of school boards in Ohio for several years, he said, but the organization decided to launch its training program after the Dec. 14 shootings at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn., where a gunman killed 20 children and six adults.

“That was the breaking point,” he said. “We decided it’s time to quit talking about it and move forward.”

The first firearms class, a three-day program at the Tactical Defense Institute in West Union in Adams County, hasn’t been scheduled nor have the participants been chosen. Applications are being accepted at buckeyefirearms.org, the website of the group, which lobbies for the rights of gun owners.

The same week that the Buckeye Firearms Association announced its offer, Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine said schools should consider arming “someone” in their buildings as the first line of defense against a gunman. Beginning Jan. 14, his office will work with law enforcement and educators to train teachers and administrators to deal with “active shooters.”

Ohio is not the only place considering arming teachers. All across the United States this issue is popping up. In my home State of South Carolina, a bill has been put forth to arm public school employees.

Arizona Attorney General Tom Horne, while claiming that the "ideal solution" would be to have an armed police officer at every school (something I completely disagree with)," but because of budget issues (something I pointed out was asking for more big government) he said the ideal was "not possible." So Horne said, "The next best solution is to have one person in the school trained to handle firearms, to handle emergency situations, and possessing a firearm in a secure location. This proposal is analogous to arming pilots on planes.”

Additionally, in Utah the Utah Shooting Sports Council is offering to train teachers to use firearms.

I have also mentioned that FrontSight.com's Dr. Ignatius Piazza has put the word out that he would train all teachers who are allowed to carry in their schools for free.

The armed police officer at every school is, in fact, asking for bigger government. I won't say that it would not be somewhat effective, but it would at the same time be extremely costly. One thing to keep in mind though as you weigh on which side of the fence you fall on (ie. bigger government or exercise liberty), is the Columbine shootings that took place. National Review writer Daniel Foster points out:

Columbine High School had a sheriff’s deputy on scene when the shooting broke out.

That’s right, but it isn’t like the deputy was sitting around eating doughnuts during the Columbine massacre. He traded fire (that is, he drew fire) with Harris for an extended period of time, during which Harris’s gun jammed. The deputy and the backup he immediately called for exchanged fire with the shooters a second time and helped begin the evacuation of students, all before the SWAT teams and the rest of the cavalry arrived, and before Harris and Klebold killed themselves in the library. Harris and Klebold had an assault plan — a sloppy plan, but a plan nonetheless. They had dozens of IEDs, some of which detonated, others of which did not. And there were two of them. In this highly chaotic tactical environment, the deputy acted both bravely and prudently, and who knows how many lives he saved by engaging Harris.

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