Free speech has officially failed.

Reports are pouring in that the politically-correct politics surrounding the term 'white privilege' are gaining traction at many universities.

Plenty of professors at various colleges across the nation are confronting students with racial and ethnic issues, and decimating their grades if they aren't sensitive enough to the use of delicate terminology.

Campus Reform reported on political correctness gone too far:

Multiple professors at Washington State University have explicitly told students their grades will suffer if they use terms such as "illegal alien," "male," and "female," or if they fail to "defer" to non-white students.

According to the syllabus for Selena Lester Breikss' "Women & Popular Culture" class, students risk a failing grade if they use any common descriptors that Breikss considers "oppressive and hateful language."

At another school, a course in comparative ethnic cultures docks students who fail to recognize "white privilege" and use terms like "illegal alien" to describe people who circumvented immigration laws and came to this country without permission.

According to [Professor Rebecca Fowler's] syllabus, students will lose one point every time they use the words "illegal alien" or "illegals" rather than the preferred terms of "'undocumented' migrants/immigrants/persons." Throughout the course, Fowler says, students will "come to recognize how white privilege functions in everyday social structures and institutions."

"The socio-legal production of migrant illegality works to systematically dehumanize and exploit these brown bodies for their labor," Fowler continued.


 

Washington State University professor John Streamas takes it even further in his detailed syllabus:

• Consider others' views. Reflect on your own social location, your privileges and power.
• Learn a historically informed definition of racism, and challenge all racist discourse.
• Reflect your grasp of history and social relations by respecting shy and quiet classmates, and by deferring to the experiences of people of color.
• Finally, understand and consider the rage of people who are victims of systematic injustice. James Baldwin wrote that people of color have an obligation to feel rage over this nation's history of racism.

Streamus even mentioned controversial host Glenn Beck by name, suggesting that Beck would have to "endure 500 years of racism" to "earn the right" to use the N-word.

A lawyer for the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education questioned the hypersensitive approach towards multicultural learning – with frequently changing "acceptable" code words that are sometimes dizzying and cloudy in their meaning:

How are students supposed to approach these sensitive and controversial materials at all, let alone to keep an open mind, if they have to fear that a misconstrued statement, or one that unreasonably offends a classmate will lead to a grade reduction or even removal from class?"

As Infowars reported, past proposals for dealing with sensitivity towards race and gender have included bizarre suggestions that students wear a "white privilege bracelet" to remind them of their privilege and to speak out to others about the issue.

Why have things shifted from tolerance and equality to an atmosphere of white guilt that is somehow supposed to be transferred to individuals who have no part in the centuries of racist institutions?

Are these policies seeking to end racism, or to point it in a new, brave direction?

Surely, these are examples of political correctness gone too far, and not part of a proper education…

Source

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