Remember when we heard all the BS about how little leagues teams would play and there were no winners or losers? Remember how grades would be curved in order to help students pass who didn't deserve it? Remember Affirmative Action and how people were placed into positions they didn't earn, but it was to fill a particular ethnic quota? Do you understand how the homosexual movement is pushing for "marriage equality?" Well now we are seeing the same thing on display at the 2012 Olympics.

Though among the top gymnasts and a favored to win Olympic gold in the next round of competition, Joydyn Wieber, because she finished third behind her other U.S. teammates Gabby Douglass and Aly Raisman, will not be moving on. No longer are the Olympics about who the very best are. No, no, the Olympic rules committee has determined that only two members of each team can advance to the all-around. It doesn't matter that your team may have the top five out of all competitors, only two from your team can move on.

Of course these athletes work pretty much their entire lives to get to the Olympics and then to find out that rules are not in favor of who is the best, but in trying to make everyone feel like a winner. It seems the rules committee wants every country to have a medal.

Know that the all-around final consisted of 24 girls. Wieber placed fourth, but because of the two team member from each country rule, she is out and others will fill the spot.

Well this is prime example of where egalitarianism gets us. Instead of rewarding hard work, talent and ability, the Olympics are rewarding where people come from.

This type of mentality in the rules, along with the opening ceremony and promotion of socialism has made for disheartening viewing of the 2012 Summer Olympics.

One thing I will say is that for a 17 year old, though disappointed in the ruling, she did handle herself in a very mature manner. While everyone can understand the tears due to missing the mark by such a small margin, it was her encouragement of teammates that causes her to stand out.

"It was hard [watching Aly on floor] because of course I wanted that spot," Wieber told Inside Gymnastics, highlighting some of the complex intra-team dynamics created by the two-per country rule. "But I also wanted Aly to do her best for the team."

She also posted the following Tweet:

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