Many may be familiar with the name of Doctor Josef Mengele, also known as "Todesengel" or "Angle of Death," who was the "medical officer" at the Auschwitz death camp.

Although records do not support his supposed role as a "physician," they do show his role as "Director, Crimes Against Humanity" and "Shower Attendee Selector / Administrator."  Basically, his primary role was to decide which "prisoners" should be sent to the "showers" (gas chambers) at any given cycle; i.e. to decide who should live and die on any given day.

Based on recent revelations from the Phoenix, Arizona VA, I have developed a theory that the Veterans Administration may have its very own "Angel of Death"; if not in the form of a single person like the good Doctor Mengele, then as a firm policy - stated or implied.

Just why would I come up with such a theory? It's because a similar "anomaly" in scheduling of appointments happened to me here in Las Vegas, Nevada.

Let me preface my theory with a statement of fact that the Doctors and staff of the Las Vegas Veterans Administration Health Care operations have, as a group, been absolutely outstanding. Our new hospital is the state of the art and my current Primary Care Physician (PCP), Dr. Diaz of the South Clinic, is the best doctor I have ever had in my life. She is both caring and efficient. She wastes no time and at the same time is more thorough, knowledgeable, and insightful than any doctor I have ever had; perhaps because she is the first doctor in the V.A. system that I have had who is less than sixty years old.

So having said all that, where do I come up with this theory of a "Doctor Mengele at the VA"?

Although I do admit that I cannot count to twenty one in public without embarrassing myself, I do love working with numbers. I have always believed that if you give me enough numbers I can prove any theory you would like thanks to the scientifically accepted theory of "spurious data points"; i.e. if the numbers do not fit the theory discard them.

Any "analysis" or "study" that does not have a large pool of data is considered invalid or in a best case scenario, specious.  In this case, I have neither an "analysis" nor have I done a "study" but I do think that both are in order.

Navy Veteran Thomas Breen is the "poster child" of the current feigned outrage by our "representatives" in Washington. The time span between when he was first seen for blood in the urine and the time he died was, but a couple of months with his follow up appointment a short time thereafter. My first thought was: Wow! That was fast (getting the appointment)! Next week I will be seen in a follow up appointment after only a four month wait.

Now, here is where things get interesting and everything is based on anecdotal data which is easily dismissed but worth thinking about.

Thomas Breen presented with blood in his urine and with a history of cancer. Most probable diagnosis to any medical professional or even the hospital janitor would be: Cancer - possibly / probably in an advanced phase.

Hold that thought.

A couple of years ago, before our new VA Hospital was open for business, I suddenly developed a rapidly growing lump in my neck that was becoming more and more painful every day. I have Agent Orange issues so alarm bells began going off in my head and that of my wife. Now at that time, the PCP would typically arrange for contracting imaging services from one of the many fine services here in Las Vegas and the patient would be seen within a seven day window. And initially, that is what happened to me. After an MRI proved nothing definitive my PCP (NOT Dr. Diaz) informed me that he "...had met the standard of care." Translation: The minimum required level of care had been provided and I should go take a hike.

I was not satisfied with that response so I managed to see another doctor in the VA system who immediately ordered a biopsy - which is what I felt was in order.

And here the plot thickens so pay close attention to timing and players in this tale.

I was told that I would be contacted for a referral to a lab that does biopsies and I expected a contact within a week or so.

Two weeks later I called the VA to see what the delay was as the lump continued to grow in size and pain level. I was assured that the request for referral had been sent to some new agency set up as a "clearinghouse" for all outside services. Sadly I do not recall the name of that agency.

Two more weeks later I again called the VA and again was assured that the request for referral was awaiting action by an outside agency / clearing house.

I want to point out that the people I dealt with at the VA were getting as frustrated as I was and they even resubmitted the request for referral.

To make a long story short, it was nearly eight months later that in desperation I finally contacted a local TV station for help. I am guessing at this point, but I assume that they "did their homework" and made inquiries at the highest levels of the Nevada VA.

The reason I make that assumption, is because shortly after contacting the local TV station I received a call out of the blue from the local Director of the Nevada V.A. That young man was as frustrated as everyone else I had talked to, but he was able to get me schedule for a biopsy within just a few days of our conversation.

As I mentioned, this all occurred long before our new VA Hospital was in operation; we vets had access to the regular military hospital at Nellis Air Force Base at the time. When I went for a biopsy, the doctor who did the procedure had been imported from civilian practice in San Diego, California. And why was that? Because the doctor who would normally be assigned to do the procedure was on medical leave...for substance abuse rehabilitation.

Now here is my theory:

It would appear that the V.A. has initiated the precursor of the Obama-Care "death panels." Thomas Breen obviously had cancer. Given my symptoms and a history of Agent Orange issues, it was highly likely that I may have had cancer; and I thank God I do not.

Cancer is very expensive to treat with only a minimal success rate. Ergo, put those veterans whose potential for high cost health care has been identified on these "phantom lists" and play the numbers that some high percentage of them will die off thus avoiding additional costs to the V.A.

I would like to see someone with access to the raw data to do a good study on such things and see if there is any possibility that what we Veterans are seeing just might be true: Is there a "Doctor Mengele" in the VA making arbitrary decisions as to who will live to see another day and who will not - all in the name of cost cutting?

Will that happen? Probably not. But if enough vets speak up, then perhaps there is a chance.

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