A DeKalb County Georgia police officer was shot after he responded to the wrong home, entering it and shooting a man and his dog.

The interesting thing that occurred during the incident is that the police officer was actually shot by his fellow officer. It's not even clear whether or not the homeowner had a gun.

11Alive reports, "The incident happened on Boulderwoods Drive around 7:35 Monday night. Three officers arrived at the residence and attempted to contact any occupants inside. When no contact was made, the officers made their way around to the rear of the home and gained entry to the residence through a screened porch. The G.B.I. said police went through a 'reportedly unlocked door.'"

So, the cops get a call reporting a burglary in progress. They fail to make sure they are at the correct address. However, they walk around behind the house and notice the door is unlocked, but not open. They illegally enter the home, since they have no warrant and have no identified the correct address. Once inside, there are several gunshots exchanged between the officers and homeowner Chris McKinley. McKinley's dog was shot and killed. The officer and McKinley were both shot as well.

The officer was shot in the thigh and underwent surgery and was in critical condition. McKinley was also treated and released from the hospital.

"A lot is yet to be determined here as to what and when shots were fired, how the officer received injuries, how the homeowner received injuries," Director of public safety Cedric Alexander said. "But we did respond to the wrong residence tonight."

AJC.com seems to imply that since the officers enter the home under the pretenses they did and announced their presence that it was OK. However, it was lawless, and it appears to me that Mr. Alexander is confirming that in saying that the officers responded to the wrong address.

"The GBI will conduct an independent investigation to determine what occurred during the incident. When the investigation is complete it will be turned over to the district attorney for any action the district attorney deems appropriate," the GBI said in a statement.

Anyone think there will be charges against the officers for what they did? They were put on paid leave, but I'm guessing they will not receive any type of punishment for what they engaged in.

In 2012, Indiana passed legislation protecting homeowners who shoot police officers who they believe are using unlawful force.

Johnny Liberty at The Free Thought Project compared two incidents where police officers enter homes, but the results for the innocent home owners were strikingly different:

December of 2013, in Somerville, Texas, Burleson County Sgt. Adam Sowders, led a team in a no-knock marijuana raid on Henry Goedrich Magee's home.  Magee, who was home with his pregnant girlfriend, believed that someone was breaking in.  Concerned for his girlfriend and unborn child's safety, Magee opened fire and killed Sowders.

In February, all charges against Magee were dropped when a Texas grand jury refused to indict, based on the belief that he feared for his safety and that this was a reasonable act of self-defense.

May of last year in Killeen, Texas, Marvin Louis Guy was also the target of a no-knock narcotics raid.

Detective Dinwiddie was one of the SWAT officers who broke into Guy's home based on a seemingly bogus informant tip-off about drugs being dealt from the house.  Alarmed by intruders climbing through his windows at 5:30 in the morning, Guy and his wife sought to protect themselves and their property and open fired- in self defense.

Dinwiddie was shot and killed; three other officers were also shot but survived.  No drugs at all were found in his home.

His case is strikingly similar to Magee's, yet Guy is now facing the death penalty.  He is charged with capital murder in Dinwiddie's death, as well as three counts of attempted capital murder for firing on the other officers during the shootout.

So, why are people like Mr. Guy not allowed to defend themselves against tyranny? Why are police officers allowed to conduct no-knock raids on homeowners and why should they assume that the homeowner does not have the right to fire back at what they perceive as intruders? In my opinion, and I believe the thinking of our founding fathers, citizens are well within their rights to defend life, liberty and property with deadly force if those who have sworn to uphold the law violate the law and violate the liberty of those they serve.

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