A third controversial nuclear test took place in North Korea on Tuesday. The test was in defiance of United Nations warnings against such testing.

The Korea Central News Agency announced the successful nuclear test, stating:

We have successfully carried out the third underground nuclear test. The scientific field for national defence of the DPRK succeeded in the third underground nuclear test at the site for underground nuclear test in the northern part of the DPRK on Tuesday.

The test was carried out as part of practical measures of counteraction to defend the country's security and sovereignty in the face of the ferocious hostile acts of the US, which wantonly violated the DPRK's legitimate right to launch satellite for peaceful purposes.

The test was conducted in a safe and perfect way on a high level with the use of a smaller and light A-bomb unlike the previous ones, yet with great explosive power. It was confirmed that the test did not give any adverse effect to the surrounding ecological environment.

The specific features of the function and explosive power of the A-bomb and all other measurements fully tallied with the values of the design, physically demonstrating the good performance of the DPRK's nuclear deterrence that has become diversified. The nuclear test will greatly encourage the army and people of the DPRK in their efforts to build a thriving nation with the same spirit and mettle as displayed in conquering space, and offer an important occasion in ensuring peace and stability in the Korean Peninsula and the region."

The Associated Press reports,

North Korea said the atomic test was merely its "first response" to what it called U.S. threats, and said it will continue with unspecified "second and third measures of greater intensity" if Washington maintains its hostility.

The underground test, which set off powerful seismic waves, drew immediate condemnation from Washington, the U.N. and others. Even its only major ally, China, summoned the North's ambassador for a dressing-down.

The test was a defiant North Korean response to U.N. orders that it shut down its atomic activity or face more sanctions and international isolation. It will likely draw more sanctions from the United States and other countries at a time when North Korea is trying to rebuild its moribund economy and expand its engagement with the outside world.

U.S. Ambassador and Benghazi fall girl Susan Rice said the test was "highly provocative." she said the tests continue to threaten regional and international peace and security and "the security of a number of countries including the United States."

"They will not be tolerated," she said, "and they will be met with North Korea's increasing isolation and pressure under United Nations sanctions."

Guy Benson, at Townhall, called the nuclear weapons program of the North Koreans "illegal."

While I do not agree with North Korea's politics or its ideology, I do have to ask a question here. Who determines that it is illegal for them to conduct these tests? Are Americans actually going to appeal to the United Nations about this and then declare the action illegal? Are sanctions against them not a prelude to war?

There is no doubt that North Korea is an evil regime, but it is an even more dangerous precedent that is set when we call their actions "illegal" and appeal to an international body that seeks to undermine national sovereignty, including our own.

In Pyongyang people gathered to watch a 3pm television broadcast announcement of the nuclear test.

In 2006 and 2009, North Korea is believed to have tested devices made of plutonium. In 2010 Pyongyang revealed a program that would enrich uranium.

"This latest test and any further nuclear testing could provide North Korean scientists with additional information for nuclear warhead designs small enough to fit on top of its ballistic missiles," Daryl Kimball and Greg Thielmann wrote on the private Arms Control Association's blog. "However, it is likely that additional testing would be needed for North Korea to field either a plutonium or enriched uranium weapon."

While North Korea does not have the capability to strike the U.S., some have indicated that "it wants to hold U.S. interests at risk of a nuclear attack to deter us from regime change and to create international leverage and diplomatic maneuvering room."

We shouldn't be involved in changing the regime anyway. Every time we get into another nation's business, it results in blowback on us.

China, though upset at the testing, called for cooler heads to prevail in the matter. Let's hope that happens. One wonders, with a country with human rights issues like China has, why there is no outrage at them by the U.S. instead of making them most favored nation.

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