As if things weren't bad enough in California, lawmakers there not only have tried to be politically correct by passing a stupid "anti-Arizona" immigration bill, but now they are funding a high-speed rail line that connects Los Angeles to San Francisco.

According to the Big Brother mapper Google, the drive would take approximately six hours and 20 minutes to drive the 381.8 miles from LA to Shaky Town. Of course that would cost individuals two tanks of gas or maybe three to drive there and back. I'm sure most people are not commuting from LA to San Francisco on a daily basis in the first place. So why does California need to put a high-speed rail line in?

It's to be "first." That's right this initial segment, proposed by lawmakers in California, will be the first dedicated high speed rail line in the nation.

While the Governor and the Obama administration are touting this as having to do with the economical growth of the state, the real issue is about being first and attributing such things to the person who is in office at the time.

According to the U. S. Transportation Secretary, Ray LaHood, "No economy can grow faster than its transportation network allows. With highways between California cities congested and airspace at a premium, Californians desperately need an alternative."

Democrat Governor Jerry Brown echoed LaHood's comments, "The Legislature took bold action today that gets Californians back to work and puts California out in front once again."

"Literally, this project means tens of thousands of jobs," said Mark Kyle, director of government affairs for the Operating Engineers Local Union No. 3, which was among the bill's supporters.

This same tired rhetoric was used in North Carolina too. Only in N.C. the issue was light-rail which was proposed by neo-con RINO Pat McCrory. It neither grew jobs, nor expanded the economy. It's also one of the reasons the man lost to a Democrat, Bev Perdue, for the race for governor.

The only jobs this will actually produce are state jobs, which are not technically jobs, but rather they are more of a drain on the economy. I understand that it provides a paycheck to people for work they have done, but their pay is dependent upon government which gets its money from the people by taxation, where private industry provides real jobs that do not force people to pay them even when they don't buy their product.

So what is all this going to cost?

According to Breitbart.com,

The bill authorizes the state to begin selling $4.5 billion in voter-approved bonds that includes $2.6 billion to build an initial 130-mile stretch of the high-speed rail line in the Central Valley. That will allow the state to collect another $3.2 billion in federal funding that could have been rescinded if lawmakers failed to act Friday.

The first segment of the line will run from Madera to Bakersfield. The final cost of the completed project from Los Angeles to San Francisco would be $68 billion.

Did you get that? That's right California will be using $3.2 billion in federal funding for this little sideshow of high-speed rail and who knows how much total federal dollars will be accumulated in the $68 billion when it's all said and done. That money will be coming from people from other states and what say do those people have about their tax dollars funding this? Sorry my fellow Americans, you don't get a voice on taxation for California to spend your money on this pet project.

The bill authorizes the sale of $10 billion of dollars worth of rail bonds. It also allocates $1.9 billion in bonds for regional rail improvements in California.

At least one Democrat was in opposition to the bill based on funding. Sen. Joe Simitian said, "Is there additional commitment of federal funds? There is not. Is there additional commitment of private funding? There is not. Is there a dedicated funding source that we can look to in the coming years? There is not."

Republican Senator Tom Harman also opposed the bill. In a statement he said, "It's unfortunate that the majority would rather spend billions of dollars that we don't have for a train to nowhere than keep schools open and harmless from budget cuts."

In the end though, it doesn't matter to many politicians how something is funded or even if it is funded, they just want to be first and have their name on it. Don't just take my word for it, listen to chairman of the California High-Speed Rail Authority, Dan Richard:

"Not only will California be the first state in the nation to build a high-speed rail system to connect our urban centers, we will also modernize and improve rail systems at the local and regional level."

And I conclude with, "At what cost Mr. Richard?" There is no question this monstrosity will be well over $100 billion when all is said and done. In fact, it would not surprise me to see it closer to $200 billion. Thanks California for sticking it, not only to your own people but, to the rest of America just so you can say you were first. That's Californication for ya!

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