The police state is a reality, but a new report indicates that you could fake being a police department and obtain over $1 million in weapons and gear.

Police around the nation are becoming more like paramilitary groups than police officers, but the question arises, how are they doing this on such small budgets?

The answer is easy.  Part of the reason they can do so is due to the National Defense Authorization Act of 1997, which implemented the Pentagon's 1033 program.

The 1033 program allows the Defense Logistics Agency (DLA)  to loan military grade weapons, equipment, and vehicles to local police departments.

According to its website, the DLA's Law Enforcement Support Office (LESO) "facilitates a law enforcement support program, which originated from the National Defense Authorization Act of Fiscal Year 1997 (FY 97). This law allows transfer of excess Department of Defense property that might otherwise be destroyed to law enforcement agencies across the United States and its territories."

"No equipment is purchased for distribution," the DLA claims.  "All items were excess which had been turned in by military units or had been held as part of reserve stocks until no longer needed."

The website claims, "Requisitions cover the gamut of items used by America’s military -- clothing and office supplies, tools and rescue equipment, vehicles, rifles and others small arms. Of all the excess equipment provided through the program, only five percent are weapons and less than one percent are tactical vehicles."

This should be disturbing to anyone who wants to keep the lines clear between local and state police and the central government.

From left, examples of night-vision goggles, a simulated M-16A2 rifle and a pipe bomb trainer obtained from the Department of Defense by the Government Accountability Office through a fictitious law enforcement agency. GAO

So, this brings us to a new report from the US Government Accountability Office (GAO), which asked the question, "...could a fictitious federal agency gain access to the program and obtain these controlled items?"

Well, apparently they can.

The GAO setup a fake website for a fictitious police department in order to obtain weapons via the 1033 program.

They received $1.2 million in weapons, including night-vision goggles, simulated rifles, and simulated pipe bombs," according to GAO's Wayne McElrath.

"As a private individual, we should not have had access to these items," he said.

“They never did any verification, like visit our ‘location,’ and most of it was by email,” said Zina Merritt, director of the GAO’s defense capabilities and management team, which ran the operation. “It was like getting stuff off of eBay.”

"The biggest problem is that DLA's internal control processes for this program were really broken," said Merritt.  "We found, for example, that when we applied for the program as a fake organization, no one ever even called us to verify information."

"They didn't attempt to come out to the location to visit us," she added.  Secondly, when the investigators went to the location, they were actually able to get the items without presenting the proper identification. Third, they were able to get

"Secondly, when the investigators went to the location, they were actually able to get the items without presenting the proper identification," Merritt continued.  "

Third, they were able to get a quantity of items that wasn't consistent with what we bid for; actually, we got more items," said Merritt.   And fourth, we found that [the DLA] just [doesn't] have a framework in order to do fraud mitigation at all stages of the program. Essentially, that puts any organization at risk of this happening again.

"Fourth, we found that [the DLA] just [doesn't] have a framework in order to do fraud mitigation at all stages of the program," Merrrit concluded.  "Essentially, that puts any organization at risk of this happening again."

The DOD said in the report that it was taking "actions to address identified weaknesses in its excess controlled property program."

While some push for this program to save money for police departments claiming that they are going to militarize one way or the other, many of us believe that if anyone is to be militarized and trained, it is to be the citizen militia, not the police departments.  However, the police seem to think they are entitled to it more than the citizens they serve.

“It suggests only that the U.S. military is one of the world’s largest bureaucracies and as such is going to have some lapses in material control,” said Jim Pasco, executive director of the Fraternal Order of Police. “Law enforcement is going to get that equipment and we’re going to use it, to protect both officers and civilians. And if we don’t get it free from the military, we’re going to have to buy it with taxpayer dollars.”

I'd say this is not a smart thing at all.  We pay for that equipment.  I ask, where is the citizen militia outlined in the Constitution?  Where is Congress supplying our training as outlined in the Constitution?  Why are we militarizing police, which is we pay attention to history, will be turned against the people in order to facilitate a dictator?

No, I'm not paranoid, but I see the writing on the wall.  We have become a disobedient people towards God, and God will not be mocked.  The very thing that many Americans think will protect and save them will be the very thing that turns on them and is used to put them into bondage and even murder them.  Don't tell me it can't happen here.  It's already begun to happen here.

Since 1991, the Department of Defense reported transferring more than $6 billion worth of its excess equipment to more than 8,600 federal, state, and local law enforcement agencies enrolled in the program.  In 2014, $980 million worth of property (based on initial acquisition cost) was transferred to law enforcement agencies.

For more on the police state, I suggest reading some of The Rutherford Institute's John Whitehead's books and articles.

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