Black lives don't matter?

Really?

Since the shooting death of the black thug and strong arm robbery suspect by a white police officer in Ferguson, Missouri, we have been hearing a lot about how much "Black Lives Matter."  And, given the celebration of the one year anniversary of society shedding itself of that thug, and the redundant riots and shootings and such in the streets of Ferguson, Missouri, again, this year, I could not help but to give the subject some serious thought.

I was raised and nurtured to become a Baptist minister, so there is a part of me that recognizes the concept of "the sanctity of life." Then I had to adjust my value systems a bit when I spent the last couple of my teenage years mucking about in the jungles of Southeast Asia where I decided that MY life matters; but I was not all that concerned about the lives of those who were Hell-bent on ending my life and those of my men and our allies.

This inane chant of "Black Lives Matter" has me contemplating the question: Just what makes any life matter? And does one life "matter more" than another life?

And as I contemplated the subject, I thought about those whose lives impacted me personally and gave me references that have guided my life in some way or another; people that I "looked up to," if you will. Being "an Army Brat," there were bigger-than-life figures like General George Patton. I married the daughter of one of his tank commanders, at one point in my life. And there were those truly unique "civilians" like that short little British fellow, Winston Churchill; and that former teacher from the Milwaukee public schools, Golda Meir; and that British lady that a Soviet journalist called "The Iron Lady," Maggie Thatcher; and that diminutive foreign lawyer via racist South Africa, Mohandas Gandhi; and the greatest American in my lifetime, Dr. Martin Luther King.

Why did the lives of these truly unique people seem to matter more so than, say, a thug like Michael Brown in Ferguson Missouri?

In my travels through a couple of dozen countries and all fifty states, I have encountered countless others of equal stature in my mind, but whose names would mean nothing outside their own communities.  And what is it that elevated these people in the minds of the world and in the minds of those in the spheres of those lesser known to the world?

In the final analysis, it is the remarkable courage and commitment of these luminaries, great and small, to put the betterment of their communities and their countries ahead of their own welfare. Churchill was a minor bureaucrat who rose to guide his nation through its darkest days and then stepped quietly off the stage. Golda Meir and Maggie Thatcher had equally humble beginnings, and, with unwavering courage and commitment, guided their countries through very troubled waters.  Ghandi and Dr. King knowingly and willingly gave their lives to change the course of history, not only for their countries but for the world, as well, and to bring brighter horizons to all people of all ethnicities, nationalities, and religions. They did great things to the betterment of all people.

Michael Brown beat the hell out of a store owner less than half his size, stole some cigars, and attempted to kill a police officer.

All life may be sacred, as we were once taught, but it is the actions of that life that give it value; i.e. make it "matter."

Chris Rock had some thoughts on this subject.

To say "Black Lives Matter," as is being done today, is to say that other lives do not matter.

Black lives do not "matter"; no more so than white lives matter or brown lives matter or yellow lives matter.  Statistically speaking, of all of God's creations, humans are outnumbered by insects and other mammals on a ratio of many millions to one.  The ability to breathe and have fairly regular bowel movements to does not lend "value" or "matter" to a life.

When a life has a positive impact on the lives around them, it begins to take on a "value," it begins to "matter" above and beyond that of a sewer rat or a cockroach; both of whom breathe and have fairly regular bowel movements.

Despite what our African born, pro-Muslim, and anti-American president is fond of saying, America is primarily a Christian nation; a nation born in the cradle of the New World, covered in her mother's blood of Freedom and Liberty, and delivered in the swaddling blankets of Judeo/Christian values.

We unhyphenated Americans value all life without consideration to nonsense characteristics such as race or religion or ethnicity.

Far too many Americans allow themselves and their communities to be separated by the almighty hyphen—a form of voluntary segregation. And if they ever want to change that reality, then they need to raise their children in the mold of Frederick Douglas, Gandhi, and Dr. Martin Luther King instead of the false narrative of "Gangsta-Rappers" and thugs like Michael Brown.

They need to raise their children to be responsible AMERICANS instead of following the Democrat-forced mentality of the entitled and underprivileged members of the self-segregating Black-Americans.

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