Three states saw advancement of anti-National Defense Authorization Act legislation this week. Arizona, Indiana, and Montana all saw significant victories.

Perhaps the most significant victory was Indiana's SB 400 which successfully passed the State Senate. This effectively places it nearly halfway to becoming law.

Montana's HB 522 passed their House Judiciary Committee with a vote of 20-0! Next up for HB522 is a debate and vote in the full State House. Bills move fast in the short legislative session

Arizona also passed its HB 2573 from it's House Judiciary Committee and will reach a full House vote.

As I've written before, anti-NDAA legislation is popping up in nearly every State of the Union and sometimes even at local levels, such as county and city. Each of these small victories are steps towards nullification of a piece of legislation that undermines the United States Constitution and the rights protected under the law of the land.

Writer and former New York Times journalist Chris Hedges is involved in an ongoing anti-NDAA case against Barack Obama that began on January 13, 2012. His and other journalists concerns were that covering stories which are related to terrorist groups that an administration might view as supportive or sympathetic could lead to their being indefinitely detained under the legislation.

In an interview with Kevin Kelly at the Washington Times Communities, Hedges said:

I had spent a lot of time [as a New York Times journalist] with individuals and groups on [the list of terrorist groups included in the 2012 NDAA], and so it gave me a standing in court that very few plaintiffs would have had.

I [and my lawyers] all understood that this was a monumental step to not only empower the military to arrest American citizens, but strip them of due process and hold them indefinitely in the language of section 1021 “until the end of hostilities," which in the age of permanent war is probably a lifetime.

Hedges case is making its way through the court system now. On February 6, 2013 oral arguments were heard in the Second Circuit Court of Appeals.

“I think the assault on the basic constitutional rights of due process is so flagrant and so egregious that we actually have a fairly good chance of winning," Hedges said of the ongoing litigation.

Meanwhile, former American military analyst Daniel Ellsberg said in an interview that he believed that signing of the 2012 NDAA into law was an impeachable offense, but also included representatives who voted for it. ""And either way, I believe we have here impeachable offenses by all of the people arguing this case, including the three senators - McCain, others - who will be arguing today on this," Ellsberg said. "We should be looking at [John] Brennan (Obama's nominee to head the CIA) and the other people connected with the torture program not in terms of confirmation hearings, but in terms of impeachment hearings and convictions."

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