The Obama Department of Justice and the NAACP have been going after states where Republicans are rightly trying to pass legislation that requires everyone that votes to present a valid photo ID in order to do so. They've even gone to the United Nations over the issue. In a new book that discusses the 2008 Minnesota Senate race titled "Who's Counting?" authors John Fund and Hans von Spakovsky point out a real life scenario with real life consequences of voter fraud.

In 2008 Sen. Norm Coleman (R) was running for re-election against Al Franken (D). After 2.9 million people had voted, Coleman was ahead by 725 votes.

Of course, you know what happened. The Democrats went to work with they lawyers to challenge the vote and honestly, anyone would have done the same with things that close. However, after the first cavass, Coleman's lead dwindled to 206 votes. Then months went by and eventually Franken was declared the winner by 312 votes.

Byron York writes on the subject:

During the controversy, a conservative group called Minnesota Majority began to look into claims of voter fraud. Comparing criminal records with voting rolls, the group identified 1,099 felons -- all ineligible to vote -- who had voted in the Franken-Coleman race.

Minnesota Majority took the information to prosecutors across the state, many of whom showed no interest in pursuing it. But Minnesota law requires authorities to investigate such leads. And so far, Fund and von Spakovsky report, 177 people have been convicted -- not just accused, but convicted -- of voting fraudulently in the Senate race. Another 66 are awaiting trial. "The numbers aren't greater," the authors say, "because the standard for convicting someone of voter fraud in Minnesota is that they must have been both ineligible, and 'knowingly' voted unlawfully." The accused can get off by claiming not to have known they did anything wrong.

Still, that's a total of 243 people either convicted of voter fraud or awaiting trial in an election that was decided by 312 votes. With 1,099 examples identified by Minnesota Majority, and with evidence suggesting that felons, when they do vote, strongly favor Democrats, it doesn't require a leap to suggest there might one day be proof that Al Franken was elected on the strength of voter fraud.

And that's just the question of voting by felons. Minnesota Majority also found all sorts of other irregularities that cast further doubt on the Senate results.

Voter fraud is a serious issue with serious implications. While the left wants to make people provide a photo ID for a job, to purchase a gun, to get a driver's license and even buy a beer, they will have nothing to do with photo IDs for voters. In fact, they oppose these laws.

As Mr. York points out in the article, voter fraud really matters when the votes are close. This has caused many to declare that if there are enough people voting to win by a large margin, then the other team can't cheat. That is about right.

Democrats try and justify their actions by claiming that they are just seeking to defend the most fundamental right, the right to vote. The point is rights come from God and the reality is not everyone is eligible to vote.

Fund and von Spakovsky write in their book are more concerned with the integrity of the voter and their vote,

"When voters are disenfranchised by the counting of improperly cast ballots or outright fraud, their civil rights are violated just as surely as if they were prevented from voting. The integrity of the ballot box is just as important to the credibility of elections as access to it."

Voter ID laws protect the votes of legitimate voters from being usurped by those who are not legitimate voters.

Voter ID laws are good. Vote early, vote often....wait, don't do that. Be an informed voter that has a photo ID.

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