Rand Paul: "People In Congress...Are Not To Be Trusted With Money"

If there is one person I love to hear speak the truth about how government isn't functioning properly it's Ron Paul (R-TX). Second to him, I do enjoy his son, Senator Rand Paul (R-KY). In an interview with Fox News' Great Van Susteren's On The Record on Thursday, Paul told her that people in Congress "cannot be trusted" and "don't deserve to manage any more money."

Van Susteren questioned the Kentucky Senator as to whether the American people should be angry at the process when it comes to the fiscal cliff.

The Senator said that he was definitely "annoyed" because he was in Washington all week and said that they "did nothing all week long."

"If the Democrats have a proposal, why don't they put a proposal forward and let's see if Republicans can agree to it," Paul said. "But they need to be part of the process, and so far I haven't seen much 'give' on the part of the Democrats."

Greta then said that Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid said that the "House is acting with the dictatorship of the Speaker." This garnered laughter from Paul as he said that he didn't know what that means necessarily.

Paul did point out that the current tax rates are going to expire. He then used an analogy about drowning, which I think makes an excellent point.
"It's like 100 people are drowning and you're going to save 98 of them by only protecting them from a tax increase, you know 98%? And my question is, 'Well, if they're all drowning, right? Which means that raising taxes is a bad thing for everyone, so why would we only do it on two to save 98% from a tax increase? Why would drowning be our policy? Why would we be in favor of a policy of drowning?' You know raising taxes. It sounds like it's a bad thing for everyone. Why are they (Democrats) so insistent that we taxes on someone?"

Van Susteren asked if Paul perceived that people were actually trying to talk and negotiate in the Senate.

Senator Paul said that he thinks that it is all happening among the leadership and said that he has to "ask the media" about the fiscal cliff because many in the Senate do feel like they are a part of it.

Paul took the time to say that he was standing up for the Constitution during the week with regards to the Fourth Amendment and personal emails, texts, and internet searches. For his stance on these things we can be thankful!

When asked if he thought most Americans will see a difference between December 31, 2012 and January 1 or 2 of 2013, Paul said that he believed that some people think that since Obama won re-election there is a certain "inevitablity" that he wants to raise taxes and that he controls the Senate and the White House. "So What I keep saying," Paul said, "is Democrats will probably win. They'll probably get their way either this year or next year and we'll get higher taxes, but it will be a bad thing for the economy. It will be a bad thing for job creation and in the end may not even do what he wants, because sometimes you raise rates and you get less revenue." Paul then pointed to England as an example of raising the rates and getting less wealthy people, which resulted in less revenue. He said that England was not in the midst of "reversing course" now.

Paul pointed to the history of lowering tax rates and increasing revenue. He noted both Ronald Reagan's approach and George W. Bush's approach of the tax cuts that are now our current, set to expire, tax rates.

Paul was also asked about the kinds of plans that are proposed, where we hear about these plans being for "ten years." The question is if a ten year plan is adopted is there a possibility that Congress might come back in two years with a completely different plan?

The Senator said it was possible and that there were two main problems with ten year projections. The first is that historically the federal government is "bad at projections." Paul said, "They can't predict what will happen next year, much less ten years."

The second thing is "You're right, future Congresses can change," Paul told Van Susteren. he then gave examples of what has taken place with regards to rules concerning legislation. He said, "We just disobey the rules. We just don't care," referring to the attitude of many lawmakers.

Paul then addressed the debt ceiling and taxes.

“I would raise the debt ceiling on one condition and that would be a balanced budget amendment to the Constitution," he said. "Barring that, people in Congress, those who I’ve met up here they don’t deserve to manage any more money. They’re doing a bad job managing the money they have. We should not send them any more money. They’re not to be trusted with money.“

Watch the interview below:

Don't forget to Like Freedom Outpost on Facebook, Google Plus, & Twitter. You can also get Freedom Outpost delivered to your Amazon Kindle device here.